Mary

Free Pattern Features: Cats

Last week we looked at dog-related sewing projects so this week we’ll focus on some items for your furry feline friends! Just like last week, a few of these projects would work for dogs too.

From Sew 4 Home is this cute and cozy pet bed.

Pet Bed at Sew 4 Home

Pet Bed at Sew 4 Home

 

At Craftstylish is a tutorial for a cat mat to protect your furniture or to use for food and water bowls.

Patchwork Cat Mat at Craftstylish

Patchwork Cat Mat at Craftstylish

 

Fantastic Toys has a fantastic set of patterns for a variety of cat toys.

Cat Toys at Fantastic Toys

Cat Toys at Fantastic Toys

 

From Canadian Living is this fur lined kitty tunnel for your playful pal.

Kitty Tunnel at Canadian Living

Kitty Tunnel at Canadian Living

 

And because these colors and this cat are so fun together, here’s one more pet bed option from Design Sponge.

Pet Bed at Design Sponge

Pet Bed at Design Sponge

Crafty Kitchen: Stromboli Recipe

This recipe is the one I am most often asked for. It’s what we make when a big group of people comes over (I think we’ve made up to 8 in one night before!) and it’s an easy to prepare meal. Basically it’s a rolled up pizza that’s good fresh out of the oven or cold from the fridge the next day. Each stromboli loaf serves approximately 3 or 4 hungry adults.

Ingredients

  • 1 loaf frozen bread dough, thawed
  • 2 eggs yolks (save whites separately for glaze)
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 Tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 pound pepperoni (or whatever toppings you normally like on pizza)
  • 2 cups mozzarella cheese
  • Optional: Spaghetti sauce for dipping.

Basic instructions:

  • Roll or stretch out dough into a rectangle approximately 10″x14″ or larger. Mix the next 6 ingredients and spread over the dough. Cover with pepperoni and/or other toppings (sausage, onion, green pepper, etc.).
  • Roll up dough into a loaf and pinch the seam together and fold over the ends. Place seam side down on greased pan (or a pan covered in non-stick foil) and brush top with egg whites.
  • Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes until top is well browned. Slice and serve with spaghetti sauce for dipping.

 

Step by step instructions with photos:

1. Thaw the dough. It usually takes about 6 hours to thaw. I take it out of the freezer bag and rub it with olive oil and place it in a loosely covered bowl. In the warmer months I just leave it on the counter and in the winter I put it on or near a heating vent. You can find the frozen dough in the freezer section, usually near the garlic bread and frozen rolls. It usually comes in a bag of 5 or 6 loaves. You can also make homemade bread dough.

2. Let the dough thaw until it at least doubles in size. The larger it gets, the easier it is to stretch so it’s okay if it even triples in size.

3. Stretch out the bread dough into a rectangle. Mix together the egg yolks and seasonings.

4. Spread the egg/seasoning mix over the dough.

5. Put on all your toppings then roll up the dough.

6. Pinch the seam shut and fold over the edges.

7. Place on greased pan, or pan covered in non-stick foil, or pan covered in foil sprayed with Pam with the seam side down. Brush with egg whites.

8. Bake until brown. Some cheese will probably bubble out.

9. Slice and serve! Serve with spaghetti sauce for dipping. (I usually use a can of Hunt’s Roasted Garlic and Onion.)

Free Pattern Features: Dogs

It’s fun to pamper pets whether you are a pet lover or know someone who is. Here’s a few ideas for those special dogs in your life. And if you’re a cat lover, don’t worry! I’ll feature a list of cat ideas next week (although there is some overlap both weeks).

First up, Urban Threads shares this cute tutorial for a dog hoodie.

Dog Hoodie at Urban Threads

Dog Hoodie at Urban Threads

 

At the Purl Bee is this cute and easy customized dog leash.

Dog Leash at The Purl Bee

Dog Leash at The Purl Bee

 

This great tutorial for a collapsible travel dog bowl is featured at craftstylish.

Collapsible Dog Dish at craftstylish

Collapsible Dog Dish at craftstylish

 

Have some fleece scraps? Use this tutorial at HGTV to braid a fleece rope dog toy.

Fleece Rope Dog Toy at HGTV

Fleece Rope Dog Toy at HGTV

 

And lastly from Martha Stewart are these fun pet ID tags with a free downloadable template.

Pet ID Tags from Martha Stewart

Pet ID Tags from Martha Stewart

Free Pattern Features: Softies + Winner

These cute little softies (plush animals) are fun for kids and adults alike! There are lots of patterns available for purchase on Etsy but here’s a few you can try out for free.

First up is this adorable little hedgehog from LollyChops. I’ve always thought a hedgehog would be a cute pet but this version would be a lot easier to care for.

Hedgehog from LollyChops

Hedgehog from LollyChops

 

Molly Monkey is from mmmcrafts and you can customize her colors and clothes for any kid!

Molly Monkey from mmmcrafts

Molly Monkey from mmmcrafts

 

Chez Beeper Bebe created this Mooshy Belly Bunny from recycled T-shirts. Just like the name says, it looks squishy and delightful.

Mooshy Belly Bunny from Chez Beeper Bebe

Mooshy Belly Bunny from Chez Beeper Bebe

 

And lastly, we already featured Pippa the Fox and Rascal the Raccoon from Ruffles and Stuff awhile back in our Fresh Picks. They’re just so cute here they are again in case you missed them the first time around!

Pippa and Rascal from Ruffles and Stuff

Pippa and Rascal from Ruffles and Stuff

Winner!

The winner of Margot Potter’s book, New Dimensions in Bead and Wire Jewelry: Unexpected Combinations, Unique Designs, chosen by random.org is Shaiha! If you’re Shaiha, I’ve sent you an e-mail with more information. Don’t forget to enter our current giveaway for the Slice Fabrique!

Fresh Picks for Thursday, 8.4.11

Sometimes, life doesn’t go as planned. Like yesterday, when our server went down for about 8 hours. Though the Craft Buds site was inaccessible, we’re back up now and planning to change servers to make sure we can continue to give you the best Craft Buds ever!

Please bear with us over the next day or so if you get an error message when logging into the site. We’re aware that there may be a slight delay in switching servers, and we’ll do our best to continue everything as planned, including our . . .

Giveaways! You can still enter the Margot Potter book giveaway (through Friday night) and the Slice Fabrique giveaway (through Tuesday night). We may adjust those end dates if we experience more delays with our site, so please bookmark these links and check back if you get an error message.

Here are this week’s Fresh Picks!

Fruit Mini Cards

Fruit Salad: Learn how to make these fruity mini cards at Little Lovelies! Allison explains paper piecing with stamps and colorful paper to make little gift tags that really pop.

Fabric Pom Pom tutorial

Shake Your Pom Poms: It’s a bright twist on the traditional pom-pom trim. Learn how to make your own fabric pom poms from this colorful tutorial at Maureen Cracknell Handmade.

Baby Girl Sandals from Leather

Leather Be: Can you believe these baby girl sandals are handmade from faux leather? Get the tutorial at Make it and Love it.

Redecorating a Room

Before and After: If you’ve ever attempted to redecorate a room from start to finish, you’ll appreciate this family room re-do at I Am Momma Hear Me Roar! It has lots of cute decorating ideas, like this jar filled with whimsy.

Adoption auction fundraiser Adoption Auction jewelry

For a Cause: Go shopping for a cause at the Gotta Have Faith Fundraiser Auction, to support adoption. Online bidding for handmade items starts Thursday at noon and ends Monday! Thanks to Kristy at Hopeful Threads for sharing.

Convertible Dress/Skirt

This dress/skirt is made with rows of ruching for lots of elastic-ey stretch, and a hidden drawstring so you can easily adjust the fit depending on how you plan on wearing it. The drawstring also ensures that if a toddler pulls on your dress/skirt, it won’t fall down! This was my first experience with ruching but now that I’ve got it figured out it’s a great way to make skirts! I’m already planning other clothing ideas using this technique.

For materials you’ll need:

  • 1 spool elastic thread
  • regular thread
  • knit fabric (approx. 1 yard of fabric, 36″x60″, but detailed measuring instructions are below)
  • approx. 1 1/2 to 2 yards 3/8″ twill tape (found by the bias tape), ribbon, or something similar for the drawstring (length depends on your measurements and if you’ll be using the dress as a halter or not)

To get started you’ll need to measure the widest part of your body. I’m a pear shape, so I measured around my hips. Then multiply that measurement by 1.25 and that will be the width of your fabric. For the length, I wanted the dress version to fall just below my knee and the skirt version to fall to just below my ankles. If I wear the skirt just slightly lower on my hips, the measurement to meet both requirements was 35″ (and I’m 5′ 5″). Add an extra 1″ that will be folded over at the top to create the drawstring casing. If you plan on hemming the bottom, add another 2″ to the length.

For ruching you’ll need elastic thread. I found it in the notions department of Joann Fabrics and it came in either black or white. Wind this by hand onto your bobbin and do NOT stretch the thread as you wind. Next you’ll thread the bobbin into your machine exactly the same as you would with thread. For the top thread, you’ll use just standard thread that matches (or contrasts with) your fabric. Using the longest stitch option, test out the stitching on a scrap of fabric. When I first tried this with my newer model Singer 4830C, the elastic was pulled so tightly through the bobbin assembly that my fabric just bunched up as I sewed and it was too tight to stretch properly. I have an old model singer (6212C) and when I tried it on that it worked just fine. From what I’ve read, most sewing machines will do fine but it’s a good idea to test yours out before getting too far into the project!

Start sewing 2″ down from the top of your fabric with the right side facing up. Leave several inches or more of thread and elastic hanging out at both sides of the fabric and do a little backstitching. As you sew, slightly pull your fabric so it’s nearly flat as it goes under the needle. Continue sewing rows 1/2″ apart for as far down as you like. I did 8″ of ruching. The photo below on the left shows how I gently stretched the fabric, and the right photo shows how the fabric looked without any pulling.

When finished sewing each row, tie the thread and elastic ends together. Between this and the backstitching, you should have very secure threads. After tying trim off the excess thread.

Switch your bobbin from elastic to regular thread and with right sides together, sew up the side seam. If it bothers you to only have a seam on one side, you can add a seam to the other side by sewing along the fold as close to the edge as you can.

Then using the steam setting on your iron, gently steam the elastic thread without pressing down the iron directly onto the fabric and it will scrunch up a bit more.

Now we’ll work on the drawstring. At the top of the dress, use your sewing machine and normal thread to create a 3/8″ buttonhole 1/4″ away from the edge of the fabric where you want the drawstring to come out. I put mine right in the front center so I could use it as a halter top but you could also put it off to the side if you don’t plan on using the halter option. I used pins to mark where I wanted to put the buttonhole.

Fold over the top toward the inside of the dress so the raw edge is just below the first row of stitching. Then, with the right side facing up sew all the way around 1/8″ above the first row of stitching. This is the trickiest part of this dress because you’ll need to sew very slowly and keep checking underneath the fabric to make sure that it’s being sewn down correctly.

Then thread your drawstring through the casing and out the buttonhole and you’re finished! The photo below shows the inside of the dress.

Optional: Hem the bottom of the dress/skirt.

Additional notes:

  • When deciding on the width of your fabric, the 1.25 times my widest measurement ratio worked well for me, but before deciding on your fabric width, you may want to wrap some fabric around yourself and make sure it feels comfortable for your preferences and not too loose or not too tight.
  • For the drawstring you’ll want to use something fairly flat because you’ll be tucking it inside the garment. The flat cotton twill is hidden by the ruching but a cord or something round would show through a little.
  • I was able to sew six rows of ruching with each really full bobbin. Before sewing each row make sure you have enough elastic to finish, otherwise you’ll need to rip out the row and start over.
  • If you haven’t sewn a buttonhole before, there’s a great tutorial over at the Purl Bee.
  • To avoid having to thread the drawstring through the casing, I sewed a length of embroidery floss into the casing of the dress and had the ends coming out of the buttonhole. I had to make sure not to stitch down the floss, but when the casing was done I just tied the floss to a safety pin, pinned it to the strap and pulled it right through!

And here’s how it looks using the straps as a halter top.

Pin It

Free Pattern Features: Selvages! + Winner

I’ve been seeing bags of selvages up for grabs in contents and in online shops and I’ve been wondering what people do with all those selvages. Here’s just a few ideas, but there’s tons out there! This is a great way to use every scrap of fabric you can. I’ve included just a few ideas here but you can find even more inspiration at Selvage Blog.

Fussy Cut shares this fun version of a mug rug/potholder. What a great gift for someone who loves to sew and cook!

Selvage Mug Rug at Fussy Cut

 

From Tallgrass Prairie Studio is this colorful spiderweb quilt tutorial.

Selvages Spiderweb Quilt at Tallgrass Prairie Studio

 

And from Living with Punks is this “Bookworm Skirt”. It’s gotten a lot of blog attention but just in case you haven’t seen it yet, check it out!

Bookworm Skirt from Living with Punks

Bookworm Skirt from Living with Punks

 

And just for fun, this project doesn’t include a tutorial or pattern but I thought it was worth including this incredible selvage dress from Ric-Rac!

Selvage dress from Ric-Rac

Selvage dress from Ric-Rac

 

The winner of the $30 credit to Dewberry Lane is:

#15 Beth T.

She said, “I receive the Dewberry Lane newsletter.” Congratulations Beth, and please check your e-mail! If you didn’t win this time, please stop by the weekly list of giveaways and enter a few more.

Fabric Wrap Belt

Summer is great for cool cotton dresses and flowy shirts, but sometimes they need a little extra color or a more defined waistline. Enter the wrap belt, inspired by an Anthropologie design! This fabric band wraps around your waist to give you definition and a pop of color. You can vary the fabrics in color or pattern, or even try a patchwork version.

This is a fairly easy project, especially if you use a decorative ribbon for the narrow center strap. For the way I made it with the fabric strap, here’s a list of the materials you’ll need:

  • The wide strap is going to be 9.5″ wide and the length is the measurement of your waist plus 6″. Measure wherever you plan on wearing the belt—under the chest, around your natural waist, or lower at the hips.
  • The narrow strap is 2.5″ wide and the length is the measurement of your waist plus 6″ multiplied by 3. For example, your waist is 34″ +6″=40″, then 40″x3=120″. You may have to cut several strips of fabric and sew them together for this length. From my fabric, I had to cut three strips 40.5″ long each, and then I sewed them all together.
  • Additional notes: I used upholstery weight fabric. For thinner fabrics you may want to use stabilizer in the wide band to help it keep its shape. Also, if you have problems with the wide part of the belt shifting, you can hand stitch one or two snaps to hold it in place.

Making the Belt:

First, if you had to cut several pieces of fabric for the narrow strap, stitch them all together. Next you’ll iron under the edge of the fabric 1/4″ on all four sides. Then fold the fabric in half lengthwise and iron again.

Stitch around all four sides of the strap (including the side that’s just a fold) to give it a more finished look.

The narrow center strap is now complete! Now on to the wide strap. Fold the fabric in half lengthwise with right sides together and iron. Stitch around the sides and top, and leave a 6″ opening in the center.

Snip the corners and turn right side out through the opening you left. Fold in the open edges and iron flat. Next, sew around all four edges.

Wide strap is complete! Now you just need to line up the narrow strap in the center of the wide band. Line up the narrow strap so there is a 6″ opening on the left as shown in the photo below. Both narrow straps hanging off the wide band should be the same length. You can offset them by a couple inches if you want the ends to be at sightly different heights once it’s tied (see the right image, 2 photos down). Once you have the narrow strap and wide band lined up, sew them together where you see the yellow rectangle in the photo below.

Your belt is now complete! Now to actually wear it, you’ll first wrap the wide band around your waist. The flap (left side in the photo above) goes underneath and the other side (right side in the photo above) goes on top of that. Then wrap the two long, narrow bands all the way around your waist in opposite directions. Bring them around to the front and tie in a knot. You can either leave the bands hanging down as they are below or tuck them under the other straps as I did in the very top photo of this post. You can click on the photo below for a larger view.

Here’s a photo of the back of the belt, and another of the front withe me looking goofy in front of the camera (and a little nervous because you can see my toddler sneaking up behind me with a baseball bat).

Enjoy! And if you make one of these Anthropologie-inspired belts, feel free to share the link with us in the comments or add to our Flickr group.

Pin It

Free Pattern Features: Summer Dresses + Winner

Do you end up doing more sewing for other people than yourself? Take some time this summer to whip up one of these cute dresses just for you! (Sewing Hope winner annoucement and link to more giveaways at the end of the article.)

Suburbs Mama keeps coming up with great dress patterns and refashions! Her latest is this cute Shabby Apple knock-off!

Shabby Apple Dress by Suburbs Mama

 

Want lots of options in one dress? Try this infinity dress by Sew Like My Mom! You can vary the look depending on how you wrap the top. You could even use different colors for the top and bottom sections.

Infinity Dress by Sew Like My Mom

 

This tank top dress from Talk 2 the Trees looks fast and comfortable for those really hot days! And its a great way to use up an old shirt or tank top that’s too short. 

Tank Dress by Talk 2 the Trees

 

And lastly, for any expectant readers, this grecian maternity maxi dress from DIY Maternity looks cool, comfortable, and cute. Exactly what a pregnant woman wants!

Grecian Maternity Dress from DIY Maternity

 

In other news, the winner of our Sewing Hope giveaway, chosen by random.org, was comment #70 by Heather Nash! Congratulations Heather! If you want to try your luck at other giveaways make sure to check our Giveaways Roundup  every week for handmade giveaways from around the web.

Free Pattern Features: For the Car

Time in the car can be stressful enough with children, wildlife, construction and crazy drivers. It’s the last place you want to feel stressed out or disorganized! Here’s a few items to keep your car in order and add some personality to that neutral interior. All these items could be customized for sports fans, guys, moms, etc.! 

Sew 4 Home shares the pattern/tutorial for making this fun looking car seat caddy. You can attach it to the front or back of a car seat and the straps easily adjust to fit to any seat.

Car Seat Caddy from Sew 4 Home

 

This trash container from A Spoonful of Sugar uses a margarine tub to keep the top open and holds a plastic bag in place.

Car Trash Bag from A Spoonful of Sugar

 

MeganT on Instructables shares her pattern for make this customized visor CD organizer.

CD Organizer at Instructables

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...