Milk Carton & Hamburger Box with Cinnamon Heart Cookies

This month for CHA (the Craft and Hobby Association Convention), Lifestyle Crafts is releasing lots of new dies and embossing folders. My favorite releases are the milk carton and hamburger boxes. Once the dies are run through the Epic (see my past post here for info on how it works), you have a flat sheet of paper cut and scored for folding. The hamburger box comes with 6 extra little shapes for making labels for each box and the milk carton comes with 4.

Once the sheets are cut, just make the folds and glue down the tabs. All the shapes I used except for the hearts come with the kits. Easy and super cute! I filled mine with small cookies (recipe below) or you could fill them with candy. I think these would make perfect party favors or Valentines for kids or adults.

As always, if you’re planning on buying anything from Lifestyle Crafts, use the code CRAFTBUDS for a 20% discount!


Cinnamon Heart Cookies

I filled mine with homemade heart spritz cookies. I used this spritz (cookie press) recipe from Allrecipes.com. The only thing I changed was using cinnamon extract rather than the almond and vanilla. I used the heart shape in my cookie press and used my finger to press down the mark left by the press:

Cookies

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1 1/4 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Sift together the flour and salt; set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, cream together the butter and sugar. Stir in the egg yolks, almond extract and vanilla extract. Gradually blend in the sifted ingredients. Fill a cookie press with dough and shoot cookies about 1 1/2 inches apart onto an ungreased cookie sheet. If you like, decorate with sugar or sprinkles at this time.
  3. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes in the preheated oven.

Then I dipped each cookie in a sugar cookie glaze, also from Allrecipes.com here and added sprinkles and red hots. You can replace some of the water in the frosting with cinnamon extract if you want a stronger cinnamon flavor.:

Glaze

Ingredients

  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 10 drops food coloring

Directions

  1. Stir confectioners’ sugar, corn syrup, and water together. Stir in food coloring if desired. This glaze must be stirred each time you use it. If it is not stirred before each use it will dry with a mottled look instead of a solid color.

 

NOTE: If you can find Dove’s heart shaped chocolates, they fit perfectly into the hearts. Just gently press them into the cookies after they are removed from the oven and you don’t even have to glaze them!

 

 

Book Review: The Crafter’s Guide to Taking Great Photos

When I first heard about this book coming out through Interweave (Interweave coupon page here) I was instantly interested. It’s always frustrating to spend so much time on a project and then have the photographs not do the item justice. So when I was able to get a copy of the book to review I jumped on the chance. The author, Heidi Adnum, has her own Etsy shop so she understands the importance of good product photography.

The book will help you from understanding your camera and staging your objects all the way to final image editing. Specifically, the book is divided into 16 total chapters including:

  • Section 1: Getting Started
  • Section 2: How to Tell Your Story
  • Section 3: DIY Accessories Tutorials
  • Sections 4-12: Each section focuses on a different craft medium such as fabrics, purses, knitting, jewelry, art, etc.
  • Section 13: Editing Essentials Tutorials
  • Section 14: Image Handling
  • Section 15: Optimization
  • Section 16: Business Advice

Each section is filled with beautifully photographed items. Besides being fun to look at, the photographs help you better understand the advice Heidi gives and how to put it into practice.

I really appreciate the thoroughness of this book. I’ve been trying to learn to better use my camera (a Canon Rebel XTi) so the first section was extremely useful to me. Each section covers a lot of material and this first one includes Light, Aperature, Shutter, Exposure, Color, Focus, Choosing a Digital Camera, Getting to Know Your Camera, Major Digital Camera Modes. In easy to understand terms and diagrams the book helped me figure out how to best utilize the features of my camera. The first section alone is worth getting the book if you want to stop using the automatic mode on your camera and switch over to manual mode.

Sections 4-12 each highlight a different art/craft medium. In each section you’ll find information on planning and setting up, composition, common problems and FAQs, and an interview with someone in that makes and photographs that chapter’s featured medium.

The last chapters help you understand how to use computer software to digitally enhance your photos so they turn out as good as possible.

To summarize, this book is a great resource for anyone trying to improve their art/craft photography. It’s beautiful to look through, easy to understand, and thoroughly covers each topic included.

 

Disclaimer: I was provided this book free of charge to review, but all opinions are my own.

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Polka Dot Charm Swap

Do you take part in the yellow, aqua gray charm swap? We listened to your feedback, and decided it’s time to polka. Announcing . . .

Polka-Dot-Charm-Swap

For this fabric swap, you will choose one yard of modern fabric that features polka dots or circles from Sew Fresh Fabrics.

They have a wonderful selection of dots fabrics. In fact, Peg and Becca have graciously volunteered to do all of the hard work for swappers, and all you have to do is sit back and wait for your lovely assortment of pre-cut fabric to arrive in the mail! You will receive an assorted charm pack of 2 charms each for all 28 prints in the swap.

What an easy swap!

Please read through all rules first, then leave a comment on this post to sign up. This swap will be first come, first served. It is limited to 28 spots. (U.S. and International swappers welcome, but postage is at your own expense.)

Maybe you’ll turn them into something like this . . .

Spotted Quilt Top
Flickr/FilmintheFridge

Swap Guidelines

1. Fill out form below to join. Once you’ve been accepted into the swap, we’ll send you confirmation and you can claim your choice of fabric. We’ll post a linky here so you can see the fabrics we have so far and choose a coordinating print.

2. Fabric MUST BE ORDERED from Sew Fresh Fabrics. There will be a special swap listing for you to purchase one yard of fabric for this swap. Your cost will be equal to the fabric and shipping for one yard.

3. Deadline for fabric selections: Sunday, Jan. 29. Deadline for fabric purchase at Sew Fresh: Sunday, Feb. 5.

LSbutton-125

Join Us!

This swap is now full.

Remember, this swap is limited to the first 28 to sign up! Once you have received an e-mail confirming you are “in” you may link up your fabric selection below. Please choose a dot or circle prints from the category Basics, Dots & Blenders at Sew Fresh Fabrics that is not already duplicated below.



LOVE Shirt Tutorial

**Note: This was one of the first posts on Craft Buds. I’ve updated it and re-posted in time for Valentine’s season since we only had a few followers when it was first posted!**

 

My sister visited this weekend and we decided to make her a shirt for Valentine’s Day based on the LOVE statue in Philadelphia. It was a fast and easy project with some homemade applique letters and a little stitching.

 

 

  1. To make the letters, iron Wonder-Under paper backed fusible web or something similar to the back of your fabric (we used Pellon 725 Heavy-Duty Wonder-Under Transfer Web).
  2. Trace the letters backwards onto Wonder-Under on the back of the fabric using a stencil of the letters. You can download the PDF of the letters for personal use here. If you have problems printing directly from Google docs, click the “Download original” button in the upper right corner of the PDF screen. Once the file is downloaded you should be able to open and print it.
  3. Cut out each letter, peel off the Wonder-Under backing and position the letters onto the shirt.
  4. Iron down the letters following the instructions on the Wonder-Under or the product you are using.
  5. Finish the shirt by doing a zig zag or similar stitch around each letter and project complete! You could skip doing the stitching but the shirt may not last as long because the letters could eventually peel off.

We found the plain long-sleeved gray shirt at Target in the men’s section. They had a variety of colors and they had a few in the boys section if you need a smaller size. Here’s a close up of the letters. We chose a navy quilting cotton for the L, V, and E. For the O we used a fabric with tiny forks, spoons and knives since my sister is well known for her fabulous baking creations. You can personalize with fabrics that coordinate with something you love, or go with a more traditional Valentine’s red/pink look. This would be a cute shirt for an adult or a child!

 

 

 

Winter Warmers: Fresh Picks for 1.21.11

Bundle up! It’s the snow season for many of us, and that means more time indoors. Why not brush up on your sewing skills by starting a new project? Or get ready for Valentine’s Day by making a sweet gift for someone you love. Here are this week’s fresh picks:

Fleece Pocket Scarf @ Dragonfly Designs

Hand Warmer: Stay cozy inside or out in this fleece pocket scarf by Heather at Twin Dragonfly Designs. Knit your own pockets, or upcycle from a too-small sweater for a fun look!

Facing Fusible Interfacing Tutorial @ Make it Love It

Hand Cut: Do you know the different between interfacing, fusible webs and fusible adhsevie? Ashley at Make It Love It shares a very complete photo guide to interfacings and fusible sewing helpers. A must read for sewists!

The Urban Jungle Bag @ Sew Sweetness

Hand Candy: The Urban Jungle Bag combines your favorite printed fabric with smart construction and a sleek, city-girl vibe. Get the free tutorial from Sara at Sew Sweetness.

Free Valentine Printables @ Imagine Gnats

Hand Delivered: Send your sweetie a printed valentine from these adorable free downloads, from Rachael at Imagine Gnats. She shares more free printables at her Flickr album.

Thanks for checking out this week’s Fresh Picks!
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Whirligig Quilt Block Tutorial

This tutorial will show you how to make a 12.5″ square whirligig block, alternating colorful scraps of fabric with your background or focus fabric. This is the perfect size for many quilting bees – I hope you find it helpful!

4x5 Bee (4th Qtr) for Elizabeth

To begin, make a template from cardboard (like a cereal or pasta box). Cut a cardboard rectangle that is 2.5″ x 3.25″.

With the rectangle positioned longways, mark 1.25″ from the top left and 1.25″ from the bottom right. Cut a straight line connecting these dots. In other words, you will slice the rectangle on a slight diagonal right through the center of the longer edges.

You now have a cardboard template that is 2.5″ (left side) x 1.25″ (skinny top) x 2.5″ (diagonal right edge) x 1.75″ (wide bottom). Discard the half of the template; you will only need one side.

From your white background fabric, cut 18 rectangles that are 2.5″ x 3.25″ (your original rectangle size). Now use your cardboard template to slice your rectangles on the same diagonal as your template, creating 36 individual pieces. Set aside.

Next, sort your scraps and locate 9 different fabrics. Each fabric scrap should be large enough to cut 4 pieces directly from the cardboard template. Cut and arrange your whirligig “wings” so that like fabrics are grouped together.

Pair each white background piece with a colored piece, right sides facing. You’ll be stitching pieces together along the diagonal.

Here’s another view showing how the white and colored fabrics should go together. As you can see, I let the top corner of the white piece stick out a bit (about 1/16″ to 1/8″), just as I let the bottom corner of the bottom piece poke out. This will actually help your blocks to be even when you stitch them together.

Use a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. This is just a hair smaller than a true 1/4″. You’ll probably want to chain-piece these fabrics to save time and thread. (See below.) Back-stitch at the beginning and end of each piece. After chain-stitching the blocks, snip the connecting threads to separate.

With the back of each block facing you, use the back of your fingernail to press each seam open. The other option is to push your seam over to the patterned side; however, I find that pressing seams open makes the patchwork look more exact. Arrange your blocks as shown.

To join these blocks, stitch the two left blocks together, then the two right blocks, using your scant 1/4″ seam allowance. Chain stitch as before, and snip the threads, to save a few steps.

Again, press the seams open, then join the left and right sides with your scant seam allowance. Make sure the center seam from each side matches up in your whirligig block.

Carefully trim edges even. You should barely need to trim off anything, but trim up to 1/8″ if anything is hanging over. This will help make your final block easier to stitch. Repeat this process for your other 8 whirligigs, being sure to trim as needed.

To join your whirligig blocks together, change your seam allowance to a true 1/4″. (I slid my needle just one place to the left.) If you forget this step, your block will be closer to 13″ square when finished.

Arrange your 9 whirligigs so you have a good balance of colors, then pin together and stitch the first two blocks from each row. Join the third block to each row, making sure each point matches up with the seam from the next block. Press the seams open, and trim each row up to 1/8″ to even up the long edges.

To join your rows, match up seams, pinning together at each intersection. Stitch slowly, slightly pulling the fabric as needed when you approach an intersection. No matter how carefully you measure, you’ll need to push and pull fabric slightly to match seams perfectly.

Using these recommended seam allowances, you should now be able to trim the block to an even 12.5″ square.  I made these blocks in assorted colors for a quilt bee on Flickr, based on this fun variation by Jessica. This is a great block to make in a variety of colors and patterns for your quilting bee.

If you make any blocks using this tutorial, feel free to send us a link, or share it in the Craft Buds Flickr pool.

 

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