e-Reader Sleeves: iPad or Kindle Cover Pattern

Zippered e-Reader Sleeve Tutorial
Looking for an e-reader sleeve to protect your iPad, Kindle, tablet or other device? This easy zippered iPad sleeve is lined and quilted to keep your device protected and dust-free! The e-reader cover can be made with our easy and free sewing pattern, which will teach you how to install a simple zipper in a fully-lined pouch. It also works great as a simple, lined pouch for your journal, pen or crafting supplies. The device cover makes a great gift, too!

Materials
– 2 fat quarters (18”x22”) of cotton quilting fabric
– Quilt batting scraps (4 pieces slightly larger than outer fabric)
– 11″ or longer zipper (1.5″ longer than the widest measurement of your device)
– Sewing machine with zipper foot

Finished Size
10.5″ long x 8.25″ wide

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted.

Cutting:

iPad Size Sleeve:
From outer fabric and lining fabric, cut (2) rectangles 9.25″ x 11.5″ and (2) zipper tabs tabs 1.5” x 3”. From batting, cut (4) pieces slightly larger than outer fabric.

Any Size e-Reader Sleeve:
Measure your device and add 2″ to height and width. For instance, since the iPad is 7.25″ x 9.5″ (and just 1/2″ thick), I added 2″ to the length and width, which is what I used for my pattern pieces.

Quilting the Panels


Stack outer fabric on quilt batting. Quilt as desired. I chose a wavy lines design.


Adhere the lining pieces against your other batting scraps, and quilt as desired. I used a can of spray baste adhesive and two free-motion quilting designs: one stipple and one square quilting shapes. Trim the excess batting off the outer fabric and lining pieces.

Prepping the Zipper


Fold zipper tabs in half widthwise, to make a square shape.


On the right side of zipper, position fold of one zipper tab so it just overlaps metal end of zipper. Center and pin in place. Using zipper foot, stitch zipper tabs in place with horizontal line along folded edge, about 1/8” from fold. Avoid metal parts as you sew.


Position other folded zipper tab so fold just overlaps edge of zipper pull. Again, center and pin in place. Test zipper to make sure tabs do not interfere with zipping. This is what your zipper tabs will look like.

Note: If using a zipper longer than 10″, pin zipper tabs so entire length from end of one tab to end of the other tab is as wide or wider than you pouch front. Then use scissors or pliers to trim off excess from zipper end.

Attach Zipper to Panels


Center zipper edge along the pouch front, so right sides of pouch and zipper are facing. Pin edge of zipper to raw edge of top flap. With zipper on top, stitch 1/4” from pinned edge.


Place the other outside panel in front of you, and align the zipper against the long raw edge, and pin. The right sides of the fabric should be facing. Stitch zipper edge to the panel.

how to sew an E-reader sleeve
This is what you should see after stitching the zipper to both outer panels.


Lay the pouch wrong side up. Pin the right side of one lining panel to the exposed zipper edge. Stitch 1/4” from pinned edges to attach the lining panel.


This is what you’ll see when you open up the first panel.


Place the raw edge of the second lining panel against the raw edge of the zipper, so that both linings face each other. Pin in place and stitch 1/4″ from the edge.


This is what the lining of your zipper pouch will look like, opened up.


If you’d like, you can top stitch very close to the zipper, to sew the lining and pouch front together. This will help the zipper from sticking due to bunched up fabric.


Leave zipper unzipped, and pin together right sides of pouch body. Pin together right sides of lining pieces.


Stitch 1/4” around perimeter of both body and lining, leaving 4” open at bottom of lining for turning.


Turn pouch inside out, and push lining into bag.

sew an iPad sleeve or cover

Press clutch and hand-stitch lining closed. Enjoy your new quilted iPad case, Kindle cover or e-Reader sleeve!

E-Reader Sleeves

If you make this free e-reader sleeve sewing pattern, we’d love to see it in the Craft Buds Flickr group! If you are looking for a beginner’s version of this project, try the Easy Lined Zipper Pouch.

Easy Lined Zipper Pouch

how to sew an easy, lined zipper pouch

Have no fear of the zipper! This lined zipper pouch tutorial will show you just how easy it is to create a zip-bag to store your goodies. When you don’t need to carry everything with you, replace your purse with a simple zipper clutch and store your keys, cards and cash! When you are done, you can use this same method to create a zipper pouch in various sizes based on your needs.

Materials
– 2 fat quarters (18”x22”) of cotton quilting fabric
– 9″ zipper
– Sewing machine with zipper foot
– Optional: medium-weight fusible interfacing

Want to print these instructions for later? Download the FREE 10-page PDF pattern with color photos here!

Finished Size
9-1/2″ long x 6-1/2″ tall

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted.

Cutting:

From outer fabric, cut (2) rectangles 10″ x 7″  and (2) zipper tabs tabs 1-1/2” x 3”.

From lining fabric, cut (2) rectangles 10″ x 7″.

Assembly:

Fold zipper tabs in half widthwise, to make a square shape. On the right side of zipper, position fold of one zipper tab so it just overlaps metal end of zipper. Center and pin in place.

Position other folded zipper tab so fold just overlaps edge of zipper pull. Again, center and pin in place.  Note: Turn the sewing machine slowly with your hand when sewing close to metal parts, so as not to break a needle.

Using zipper foot, stitch zipper tabs in place with horizontal line along folded edge, about 1/8” from fold. Avoid metal parts as you sew. Test zipper to make sure tabs do not interfere with zipping.

sewing zipper tabs

Your zipper should look like this with both of the tabs attached.

Center zipper edge to pouch front, so right sides of pouch and zipper are facing. Pin edge of zipper to raw edge of top flap.

With zipper on top, stitch 1/4” from pinned edge.

Stack clutch back on clutch front, right sides facing, and pin raw edge of clutch back to free edge of zipper and repeat stitching.

This is what your pouch front should look like, when opened.

Now, it’s time to attach the lining!

Lay out the zipper pouch with the fabric wrong side up. (In the picture above, one outer fabric panel is folded back.) With wrong side of lining facing up, pin right side of lining to exposed zipper edge, as pictured.

When you fold back the lining, this is what you should see: the right side of the lining fabric. Stitch 1/4” from pinned edge to attach the first lining panel.

Now, repeat this process to attach the second lining panel on the exposed zipper edge. Pin the lining right side down against the raw edge of the zipper, and then stitch 1/4″ from edge.

This is what the lining panels will look like when they are sewn. You should see the back of the zipper and the right sides of both lining panels.

Leave zipper unzipped, and pin together right sides of clutch body, making sure to align top strips. Pin together right sides of lining pieces.

Stitch 1/4” around perimeter of both body and lining, leaving 4” open at bottom of lining for turning.

Through the opening you left earlier, carefully turn the bag inside out. Push lining inside of the bag and smooth out the corners. Press pouch and hand-stitch the lining closed.

How to sew a simple zip bag

Enjoy your new lined zipper pouch! Wasn’t that easy? If you make this pattern, we’d love to see it in the Craft Buds Flickr group!

How to sew a zipper bag

Once you are comfortable with this simple zippered pouch, try out the quilted version: e-Reader Sleeves: iPad or Kindle Cover Pattern.

Download the FREE printable PDF pattern with color photos here!

Book Review: Modern Designs for Classic Quilts

Today, we are excited to have a guest post from Elizabeth, with a review of the book Modern Designs for Classic Quilts. Take it away Elizabeth!

Happy Thanksgiving Craft Buds friends! I’m Elizabeth from Inspire Me Grey, and on this day of traditions and celebrations, it seems like the perfect time for a little review of the new quilting book Modern Designs for Classic Quilts by Kelly Biscopink and Andrea Johnson. With this book, Kelly and Andie celebrate traditional quilt designs by giving them new twists in modern fabrics, layouts and creative designs.

Full disclosure: This in no way affects my feelings about the book, but Kelly is a friend of mine – like, a real-life friend and not just a blogland friend. We go way back – to birth, really. Her parents are my godparents, and Kelly and I overlapped a couple of years at the same university. It was fantastic to discover that we have quilting in common, and I’m thrilled to review her (and Andie’s) book for Craft Buds.

So back to the review. I really like the “hook” of this book. Some quilting books are just patterns and projects with no common thread to really hold them together. What makes this one special is the connection of classic designs done in new ways. Kelly and Andie take things like flying geese, coins, hexagons and Dresden plates and do some really cool things with them. They also provide a great primer on basic techniques, including this split-screen of how they each handle matching straight seams differently. (No pretending that everyone does it all one way here! Yes, you have options!)

My personal favorites (and recent additions to my “must make” list) include this spotty kaleidoscope pattern and Andie’s Midtown Girl:

I took the book with me on vacation last week and my mom picked these Dresden plates as her faves:

Full disclosure: Elizabeth is a real-life friend of mine, and she is not kidding about this book. I’ve also take a look, and this has to be one of my favorite quilting books of the year. Love the quilts, fabric, patterns, illustrations . . . It’s a must have!

Hop over to Elizabeth’s blog to see a quilt-in-progress from the book.

Blog Tour!

Monday, 11/5 Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Tuesday, 11/6 Lindsay of CraftBuds
Wednesday, 11/7 Jill of Darling Jill Quilts
Thursday, 11/8 Faith of Fresh Lemons
Friday, 11/9 Tracy of Generation Q
Saturday, 11/10 Angela of Quilting is my Therapy
Sunday, 11/11 Shannon of Stitch Craft Create
Monday, 11/12 Laurie of Scarlet Fig
Tuesday, 11/13 Kaysie of KZJo’s Studio
Wednesday, 11/14 Jessica of A Little Gray
Thursday, 11/15 Mary of The Tulip Patch
Friday, 11/16 Deborah of Whipstitch
Saturday, 11/17 Lindsay of The Cottage Mama
Sunday, 11/18 Jenny of Sew Kind of Wonderful
Monday, 11/19 Carla of LollyQuiltz
Tuesday, 11/20 Thomas of Thomas Knauer Sews
Wednesday, 11/21 Brenda of Pink Castle Fabrics
Thursday, 11/22 Lindsay & Liz Rea of CraftBuds & Inspire Me Grey
Friday, 11/23 Sarah of The Last Piece
Saturday, 11/24 Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Cara of Cara Quilts

Review: Project Life Clementine Edition

Review of Project Life Clementine Edition

Have you heard of Project Life? I first heard of it when one of my favorite fabric designers, Heather Bailey, announced that she was going to be designing a collection of journaling cards for Project Life, and I headed over to see what the buzz was about. Apparently, I’d been living under a rock, because the photo journaling community is filled with people who are giddy each time PL announces a new collection.

Project Life Clementine Edition

In a nutshell, Project Life offers scrapbooking alternative for busy people! If you are interested in photo journaling but don’t have the time to search for coordinated papers, stickers and embellishments, all you have to do is purchase a Project Life Core Kit, filled with journaling cards, and the specially designed photo sleeves, as well as a 12 x 12 scrapbook binder.

There are also digital Project Life kits, which you can link to your Shutterfly account and use for digital scrapbooking.

Project Life Clementine Edition

The cards have different designs on each side, except for the first page and last page cards. Those have suggested placement diagrams on the back, so it’s very easy to just jump right in with Project Life, even if you don’t have any experience with scrapbooking.

Project Life Clementine Edition card, what's included

Each kit comes with more than 600 cards. The journaling cards come in two sizes (3 x 4 and 4 x 6), and you can choose an assortment of cards with sentiments and blank space for you to write in your own notes.

The layouts look great just as they are, or you can dress them up by adding your own scrapbooking stickers, stamps or embellishments! Just add them to the cards before you slip them in the photo sleeves.

The only part of this kit that confused me was how to create a “spread” of pages, left and right. Because of the way the sleeves are designed, you can only slip photos into one side of the page. To use both sides, I flipped one of the photo pages upside down, but then I realized I could just leave the page as is and slip the journaling cards in through the back of the page. You can also still use both sides of the photo sleeve, since most of the cards are double-sided. Just slip a colored card (or a second photo) behind each of your photos to hide the back.

Here is a page my mom and I created with photos of a family trip to a log cabin. It was really simple to put together, and since we had more photos than needed to fill the four large slots, we layered some photos on top of the smaller journaling cards.

These playing cards that come with the kit inspired a trip to the new casino near my parent’s house. Can you believe my mom walked out a winner? Look at those Triple 7s!

I really enjoyed Project Life and am excited that I got the opportunity to review it! [I received this product free of charge, but was not otherwise compensated for this review. All opinions are my own.]


If you are looking to get into scrapbooking but don’t have the time or money to buy a lot of supplies, Project Life, really is a good deal, considering you don’t have to have any special punches, cutters, papers or other tools to get started. Before I tried this kit, I wasn’t sure if Project Life was something I’d get into. But putting together these pages is a great family project to do with your kids (no mess!), and the cards are so pretty that it makes you want to take photos and get them printed, just so you can play! It’s all about documenting the little moments of life.

What about you? Have you heard of Project Life, or given it a try? Do you develop or print your photos, or store and share them digitally?

Modern Designs for Classic Quilts + Giveaway!

Today, we are continuing the fun of Craft Book Month with a Q&A from two authors of a modern quilting book that you are going to love! Kelly Biscopink and Andrea Johnson are co-authors of the new release Modern Designs for Classic Quilts: 12 Traditionally Inspired Patterns Made New (F+W Media). We are thrilled to help them kick of the blog tour of their book, which begins today.

Ladies, congratulations on the release of your new quilting book! How did you both meet, and can you tell me a little bit about your blogging and how that played a role?

Andie: I work at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in the Bone Marrow Transplant unit. Kelly works at the College of Charleston’s Sottile Theatre. The two of us met through the Cincinnati Modern Quilt Guild and became fast friends. It was just one of those instant connections!

We both have the same love of traditional quilts but are really excited about the modern scene that’s been booming over the last few years. We do have blogs (AndieJohnsonSews and Stitchy Quilt Stuff) and enjoy them as both a creative outlet and a way to expand our sewing circle of friends. Our blogs have given us a voice in the sewing community, and we love being connected to sewists and quilters all over the world.


Can you tell me a little bit about how you got this book idea off the ground?

We were at a sew-in event one Saturday and started talking about why we love quilting, and realized we both had very traditional quilting backgrounds but love the modern aesthetic. The idea for our book was born out of that conversation. A few weeks later over coffee, the book outline was nailed down and we started putting together a proposal. After a lot of back and forth and some crazy twists of fate, it was acquired through F+W Media.

Were there any surprises along the way when it came to the work that goes into writing a book?

Shockingly, the surprises were few. We worked so well with each other, and our editors and our publishing company staff were great at guiding us through each step.

Andie: As far as the projects go – creating pieces that I thought would be scrutinized by quilters who bought the book introduced a tiny sliver of self-doubt. I’m used to creating what I want when I want to please me, so when going through this, I put a lot of pressure on myself, which kinda sucked some of the joy out of the process. But overall, it was a pretty amazing experience.

Kelly: Coming from an editorial background, it was fascinating being on the “other side” of the writing process. I had no idea how personal this book would be, how much I would agonize over it. I also can’t even tell you how surprisingly emotional it was to see the book for the first time!

Do you have any advice for someone looking to write a craft book? What lessons have you learned along the way?

Concept is everything. We happened to have an idea that was timely and on trend with what’s going on in the quilting community. We both have experience in writing patterns and we’re been quilting and sewing for years, so we felt confident that we could execute the design, patterns and writing of the book. Also, it really helped that we knew people in the industry.  If you have a great concept with lots of project ideas and can provide examples of your work, submit to a publisher! You never know what can happen.

Blog Tour!

Monday, 11/5    Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Tuesday, 11/6    Lindsay of CraftBuds
Wednesday, 11/7    Jill of Darling Jill Quilts
Thursday, 11/8    Faith of Fresh Lemons
Friday, 11/9    Tracy of Generation Q
Saturday, 11/10    Angela of Quilting is my Therapy
Sunday, 11/11   Shannon of Stitch Craft Create
Monday, 11/12   Laurie of Scarlet Fig
Tuesday, 11/13   Kaysie of KZJo’s Studio
Wednesday, 11/14   Jessica of A Little Gray
Thursday, 11/15   Mary of The Tulip Patch
Friday, 11/16    Deborah of Whipstitch
Saturday, 11/17   Lindsay of  The Cottage Mama
Sunday, 11/18    Jenny of Sew Kind of Wonderful
Monday, 11/19   Carla of LollyQuiltz
Tuesday, 11/20   Thomas of Thomas Knauer Sews
Wednesday, 11/21   Brenda of Pink Castle Fabrics
Thursday, 11/22   Lindsay & Liz Rea of CraftBuds Inspire Me Grey
Friday, 11/23   Sarah of The Last Piece
Saturday, 11/24    Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Cara of Cara Quilts

We’ll be back later this month with a book review and a sneak peek at Elizabeth‘s project from the book. If you haven’t taken a look at this book yet, it is gorgeous and the ideal project book for your next sew along!

Giveaway!

F+W Media is generously giving away a copy of Modern Designs for Classic Quilts to one lucky Craft Buds reader! Leave a comment below for your chance to win. For your comment, you can tell us your favorite “traditional” quilt block or pattern. Also, let us know if you might be interested in a sew along for the book. Sounds fun, right?! 😉

We’ll choose one random winner next Monday, November 12, 2012.

Congrats to our winner, #205 Sherri Noel!

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