“My Peeps” Shirt with Free Printables

The herald of spring and Easter has arrived in stores, the marshmallow peep! Now that it’s arrived I thought I would make a shirt for my son featuring the peeps.…

Swap With Us! Low Volume Plus Blocks

I thought it was time to host another craft swap! This time, we will be swapping low volume plus blocks. These quilt blocks are easy and relaxing to sew, especially…

Reusable Sandwich Bags

Get ready for a delightful summer picnic in the park with these reusable sandwich bags! Made from oilcloth, these bags are easy and fun to whip up in a variety…

All-In-One Picnic Blanket Tote

With summer just around the corner I’m getting ready to enjoy to family picnics and being outside again (finally!). I wanted to make a picnic blanket that was waterproof on one side…

Great Kid’s Gift: Number Bean Bags Tutorial!

My friend’s son turned two yesterday and I wanted to make him something that a little boy (or girl) could enjoy playing with. I’ve seen variations of counting bean bags on different blogs and decided to come up with my own version. This set has nine beanbags plus a matching drawstring tote bag. You can find the matching tote bag here!

To make these, you’ll want to download my instruction sheets and pattern (free with a free Craftsy account!) that includes the numbers and square for the beanbags. I didn’t use a number zero but my husband was concerned that someone might want it so it’s included in the pattern. First, print out the pattern and cut out all the paper numbers and 9 fabric squares for the beanbag fronts and 9 fabric squares for the backs. I did brown for the front and different colors and patterns for the numbers and backs.

Next, cut out nine fabric rectangles a little larger than your numbers. Iron those to a strip of fusible web. On the back, trace each number backwards then cut out each number.

 

Peel the backing off the fusible web and iron the numbers to the centers of your beanbag fronts. If you want more details on making the number appliques you can see my post on appliques here.

Then I did a loose zig zag stitch with my sewing machine around each number. The curves got tricky and so I had to turn the hand wheel for some parts and stitch very slowly. Next put right sides together of your beanbag fronts and backs and stitch them up leaving a 2″ opening at the bottom. When you are done stitching, turn them right side out.

Then we took a break while my son played with them :).

Okay, break is over and back to work! I tried to fill these with a funnel but my funnel opening was too small so I used a rolled up paper plate to fill each bag with black beans. I filled each bag until it was 3/4 full and used a pound and a half total for all nine bags.

Next I sewed the openings up using a slipstitch. A slipstitch is a (mostly) hidden seam. Do do this you’ll first fold the raw edges inside. Then knot your thread and starting at one end of the opening you’ll alternate between the inside folds of the fabric stitching about 1/16″ inch of fabric on each side then pull tightly.

Beanbags are now finished and ready to be played with!

And like I mentioned earlier, you can also make a matching drawstring tote to keep them in.

 

Fresh Picks for Thursday, 3.17.11

Here are this week’s inspirations! If you’d like us to consider your project for Fresh Picks, fill out the submission form here.

Tokyo Subway quilt

Elizabeth at Oh, Fransson! is raffling off this beautiful Tokyo Subway quilt to one lucky winner. To enter the giveaway, make a donation to the Red Cross Japan Tsunami fund by Wednesday, March 23 and let her know.

DIY "Lucky Charms" Notebook

Kirsten’s Lucky Charms notebook at The Crafting Chicks, with tutorial

A Despicable Me birthday party at Obsessively Stitching

Despicable Me games, attire and minion birthday decor at Obsessively Stitching

Quilted pan handle

Meg’s quilted pan handle at Monkey Beans

 

Giveaways Roundup

If you haven’t stopped by, make sure you check out the Craft Buds Giveaway Roundup, with 22 current giveaways to enter! It’s updated each week, and you are always welcome to link up your craft supplies or handmade giveaways.

Sherbet Pips Charm Pack Giveaway

Melissa at The Polkadot Chair is featuring Lindsay’s travel changing mat tutorial! And Mary’s going to be on One Pretty Thing!

To celebrate this and the launch of Craft Buds, we’re offering a giveaway of two Sherbet Pips charm packs. In case you haven’t heard, these new Moda precuts are flying off quilt-shop shelves like hot cakes. Melissa even featured them in her recent zig-zag skirt.

Giveaway is now closed. Congrats to the winner, #39 Marci at Marci Girl Designs!


To enter, just follow this blog and leave a comment letting us know you did! (You may be a public follower on Google Friend Connect, RSS subscriber or newsletter follower.) For a bonus entry, “like” Craft Buds on Facebook and leave a second comment.

One winner will be selected via Random.org on Friday, March 18 at 9pm.

Tutorial: Flat Iron/Curling Iron Travel Case

My flat iron is hands down the best thing that’s happened to my hair. I don’t travel without it! It seems like like straightening my hair is one of the last things I do and then I can’t pack the flat iron or I wrap it in a towel to avoid burning my clothes. Enter the flat iron travel case! This baby means I can straighten my hair then immediately pack it up for storage or for traveling.

For this project I used an upholstery weight fabric and a silver quilted ironing board fabric cover. I found the ironing board fabric at my local JoAnns. My flat iron is a CHI 1″ ceramic so that’s what I’ve based all my measurements on. The trickiest part of this project is measuring correctly.

Here are the measuring guidelines I used:
1. Length: Measure the length of your flat or curling iron not including the cord then add an extra 1/2″. The CHI is 10 1/4″ so once I add the extra 1/2″ I’m using 10 3/4″.
2. Pocket width: Measure the diameter around the widest part of your flat or curling iron and add 2″. CHI diameter at the widest point is 5″. Add 2″ and my pocket is 7″.
3. Flap width: Use half of the measurement of your pocket for the flap. That’s 3 1/2″ for me.
4. Total width: Add together the pocket plus the flap (7″ + 3 1/2″ = 10 1/2″) then subtract 1/2″ (10 1/2″ – 1/2″ = 10″).

Now you’re going to match up right sides of the flap and the pocket and stitch them together. I found that the fabric fed more smoothly with the batting side of the quilted fabric facing up.

Open it up and place it on top of your remaining piece of fabric with wrong sides together and pin. Stitch a seam down the flap 1/8″ from the seam between the two fabrics.

Now trace out and cut the corners on the flap. I used a drinking glass.
At this stage you can cut an optional plastic mesh to add to the flap to help stabilize it. When the project is all done this makes wrapping the cord around the flap easier. I used a sheet of plastic mesh (also called plastic canvas) that I found near the yarn in JoAnn’s. This is the same mesh you may remember stitching yarn through to make a tissue box cover as a kid–or at least that’s how I remember it! I cut it to fit the flap but left a 9/16″ border. I wanted to make sure that when I added my 1/2″ bias tape there was no chance I was going to hit the plastic with my needle.

Once the mesh was cut I did a loose stitch all around the piece to hold it together. Just to reduce the possibility of hitting the mesh with the sewing machine needle, I started sewing at the X and went almost all the way around, slid the mesh into the opening then finished stitching the rest of the way back to the X.

Now you’re going to add bias tape all the way around and it’ll look like you’ve made a hot pad. That means you’re almost done!

Now fold your pocket over. Stitch three seams, one just to the side off the bias tape and two seams on the bias tape. You really only need one seam, but the three seams help stabilize the area where you’ll be wrapping the cord around.

At this stage I added the strap. It may be easier for you to add it while you’re stitching on the bias tape. As is, I had to seam rip a half inch opening, inserted the strap, folded it over, then stitched it down. You can click the image below to enlarge it to see exactly what I did. You’ll also see that I stitched a decorative button and a snap onto the strap. I used a strap that was 8 1/2″ long, and tucked 3/8″ under the bias tape and folded the end with the button over 3/8″ to reinforce it. In case your flat/curling iron has a longer or shorter cord than mine, you may want to put it in the pocket and wrap the cord around the flap then measure how long your strap needs to be rather than using my measurements.

Here’s a close up of the button/snap area:

And you’re finished! Ready to travel or organize!

PS. Click on any of the photos for a larger view!

Fresh Picks for Friday, 3.11.11

Here are this week’s fresh picks! If you’d like us to feature your project, fill out the submission form here.

Grrr…. dinos!

Dino Tails at Running with Scissors

Dino Tails tutorial at Running with Scissors

A fun and funky way to freshen up wall space!

Fabric embroidery hoop wall

Fabric embroidery hoop wall at EmmmyLizzy

A place to lay your heads.

His and Hers pillows at Honeyscrap

His and Hers pillows at Honeyscrap

Til next time!

Giveaway Roundup

Have a giveaway going on at your site and want to promote it here? Add a link to your giveaway and include the end date so people don’t miss out on the fun!

Example: 9/28 Birthday Giveaway @ Lindsay Sews

Hoping to win a giveaway? Check us out every week for a new list of current giveaways! Just remember to read and follow the rules for each giveaway to make sure your entries are valid.





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