Tag Archive for half square triangles

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt Tutorial - Craft Buds

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt - Free Pattern

If you are looking for a crib-size quilt top that you can piece together in one evening, this half-square triangles quilt pattern is perfect for you. It features 6 fat quarters of assorted fabric prints and large, 8″ x 8″ half-square triangles (HSTs), that you can make 8 at a time.

Finished Quilt Size: 38″ x 53″

Online Quilting Class

Fabric Requirements:

– 6 fat quarters (18″ x 22″) of coordinating fabric prints
– 5/8 yard white border fabric
– 2 2/3 yards backing fabric (allows for 4″ of overage on each side when quilting)
– 3/8 yard binding fabric
– Crib size (45″ x 60″) quilt batting… I like a high-quality crib batting like Warm & Natural (affiliate link)
To get started, break your fat quarters into three sets that match well together. Look at the colors as well as the scale or size of the design.

Spread out and stack two of your fat quarters, and trim to an 18″ x 18″ square.

Now, stack your 18″ x 18″ squares with right sides facing. Mark a diagonal line from corner to corner on one wrong side with a ruler and pen. Pin together the fabric squares at the corners to hold the fabric in place while you sew.

Take your fabric to the sewing machine. With the marked side facing up, stitch a line 1/4″ from the edge of one marked line, to both the left and right of that line. Repeat with the other marked line.
After you’ve stitched the four long lines, notice how the stitch lines go right through the center of the block. With your ruler and rotary cutter, cut the block into four equal quadrants using this center and the block’s straight edges as your guide. For more tricks on making HSTs at a time, visit my guest post at Sew Mama Sew.

Use your ruler and rotary cutter to cut along the line you marked earlier, through the center of your stitched lines. Repeat with the other blocks, and you’ll have 8 half square triangles.

Press the seams open with an iron. This is my Panasonic Cordless Iron (affiliate link) which I love!

Using a square ruler and your rotary cutter, trim each block to 8″ square. Line up the 45-degree line of your ruler with your half square triangle before you cut.

Here are the eight 8″ half square triangle blocks from just two fat quarters. Repeat with the other fat quarters, and you should have 24 total blocks.

Arrange your blocks in a 4×6 grid. I kept my blocks in a set order, with the colors pointing to the upper-left and the grays pointing to the lower-right.

With right sides facing, pin together the blocks in each row and stitch. Press the seams open.
Next, join together the rows with right sides facing, and pin at each seam. Stitch together the rows and press the seams open.

To make the border, cut your border fabric 5″ x the width of fabric, for 4 strips total. Starting in one corner, attach a border strip to the top, then trim the excess. Repeat with the bottom. Stitch the ends of these strips to the other to border strips you’ve cut for the sides, to lengthen them. Press the seams open, then stitch the left and right border strips to the quilt and trim.

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt - Free Pattern

Press the seams open. Baste, quilt and bind as desired. After quilting and before binding, I trimmed the borders to 4 1/4″ to keep them even all the way around. This pattern is very beginner-friendly, and I’d recommend it for showing off strong prints. I hope you’ve enjoyed my tutorial, which I originally posted at Sew Lux Fabric!

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt

Accuquilt GO! Baby Fabric Cutter Review


Yesterday, I got a GO! Baby fabric cutter in the mail, sent by Accuquilt for me to review! It came with three dies of my choice (hexagons, 2.5″ strips, and half-square triangles), and two cutting mats (one long for the strips, one short for the squares and hexagons).

One of the perks of this machine is the portability. Pulling it out of the box, I could totally see myself taking this with me to quilt guild meetings. It is nothing like lugging around a sewing machine, or even my heavy Cricut.

When I told my non-sewing friends I was getting a GO! Baby, I compared it to a pasta machine. The cutting dies have sharp blades stored deep in a dense layer of foam, so there is little to no chance of cutting yourself. You put the fabric on top of that, then stack the cutting mat on top like a sandwich, which weighs down your fabric if it’s a little wrinkly. When you line up the edge of the cutting die and mat to the GO! Baby and turn the crank, it rolls through like pasta, and the pressure from the machine cuts the fabric inside against the shape of your die.

My first adventure was cutting hexagons from scrap fabric. If you are using scraps, Accuquilt suggests pulling the fabric taut to find the correct grain. Even after reading the instructions thoroughly, I wasn’t sure which way to orient the fabric, so I watched this video to be sure. I cut up to 4 hexagons at a time, in less than 30 seconds. I’d say the accuracy of cuts is definitely not possible with scissors or a rotary cutter. Winner: Accuquilt!

Next, I was excited to try out the 2.5″ strip cutter. I pulled out a yard of Jennifer Paganelli fabric that I will use for quilt binding.

In order to cut strips of any length, I folded the fabric back on itself for one continuous cut. The ends of the die are open so the only cuts are lengthwise. It was true that I could cut up to 6 layers of cotton fabric at a time! If you are still not picturing how this works, here’s another great video showing how to cut fabric strips with the Accuquilt GO! (the larger machine).

From start to finish, I cut my fabric into 6″ sections, and ran them through to GO! Baby to create all of my 2.5″ strips in less than 10 minutes. Most of the time was spent with me lining up my fabric to make sure I was doing it correctly. It’s so easy to use, but I was a little nervous that I might mess up my fabric. Needless to say, this didn’t happen, and I’ve never had such accurate cuts before!

Here you can see my mountain of strips (bottom left) and the waste for an entire yard of fabric (bottom right). In person, it’s not much more than a handful, and I will probably use these for some other kind of craft, like card making.

I actually had fun ironing these strips into binding, because they was cut so perfectly straight. I could see how useful this machine will be for making strip quilts or homemade jelly rolls. The 2.5 inch die is the only strip size offered for the GO! Baby machine, however. If you want other sizes of strips (starting as small as 1 inch), you’d have to upgrade to the larger Accuquilt GO!

A tip from Accuquilt: You can use the strip die to cut 2.5 inch squares. Just turn your strips perpendicular to the die, fold the fabric back onto itself, and run through the machine to turn strips into squares. Turn the strips at an angle, and you’ve got diamonds instead.

Accuquilt Half Square Triangles Here’s are some Kona Bone scraps that I used to make half-square triangles. As you can see, the corners are already clipped or dog-eared to save you from trimming later. Although the cutter says to run a maximum of 6 layers through the machine, I cut 8 at the same time. Though the cuts came out perfect, I wouldn’t recommend any more than 6 layers because the “fabric sandwich” is so thick you can hardly get it through the Accuquilt.

My mom asked me if the dies ever need sharpened. Accuquilt says no, the die blades will never need to be sharpened, but you will need to replace your cutting mat after it has been sliced and diced enough times. I’d estimate that one mat would probably last me 6 months to a year with average use, if I used both sides (recommended). One thing I can confirm is that fabric threads do stick inside the die blades, so you should keep a pair of tweezers nearby to pick out stray threads.

Easy quilt binding with the Accuquilt GO! Baby
Can you tell I’m going to love this machine? I can see myself using the half-square triangles and strips dies all the time. I think my next die to try out will be the circles and maybe the equilateral triangles, which coordinate with the hexagons.

22 Free Patterns - Download Now Quilters and sewists can sign up for 22 free patterns when they sign up for Accuquilt’s e-mail list. Thank you Accuquilt!

Enter the Accuquilt Giveaway here! (Ended July 4, 2011)

Speaking of giveaways . . . out of 68 comments, the winner of the giveaway form Kalla’s Creations is #11 lisa, who said “I follow via email.” Congrats Lisa, and thanks Michaella for sharing the goodies from your cute shop!

Rainbow Diamonds Mini Quilt Tutorial

This weekend, I finished up a Diamonds Mini Quilt I’ve been working on, and posted on my other blog, Lindsay Sews. There was some interest in a tutorial, so I whipped one up and decided to share with Craft Buds readers as well!

For this tutorial, I focus mostly on how to construct the quilt top, but for tips on quilting in general, check out this awesome series, Quilt Class 101 at Chasing Cottons. You’ll learn about cutting fabric, choosing batting and thread, binding techniques and more.

Diamonds quilt hanging

For this quilt, you can go bright with rainbow solids like I did, or focus on prints. Choose masculine colors, girly colors or whatever you like. Once you learn the basic technique of sewing half-square triangles, the options are endless!

Materials:

  • 1 Kona Solids Charm Pack: Brights, 43 charms (5×5 squares)
  • 2 extra solids charms (5×5 squares), pick any color (You can use scraps–these can even be the same color if needed)
  • 7/8 yard solid gray quilting fabric (such as Kona medium gray)
  • Binding, batting, backing fabric to fit

Finished Size: 36.5″ x 40″

Steps:

1) Cut gray fabric into 5-inch wide strips, them 5-inch wide charm squares. (See charm squares cutting tutorial here.) This makes 48 charm squares, and you will use 45 of them.

2) You will need one Kona Brights charm pack, but I also used additional colors that were not in my pack. Choose some solids scraps and cut two squares (5×5) to add to the colors in your charm pack. It’s not that important which colors you choose, because you’ll be able to find a place for all of them later.

3) Pair one colored charm with a gray charm, and sew/cut a Half Square Triangles unit. (See tutorial here.) You now have two half-square triangles featuring the same solid.

4) Repeat for the rest of your charms until you have 90 finished half-square triangle blocks.

5) Group blocks together by color family. (Blues, reds, greens, pinks, purples, etc.) Take your biggest stack, and arrange 12 blocks (6 solids, 2 blocks each) in a diamond formation. Matching HSTs should be next to each other, creating a larger triangle or parallelogram. (See pink diamond, below, for example).

  • Take your next largest color stack, and arrange 12 blocks (6 solids, 2 blocks each) in another large diamond formation. (See green diamond above, for example.) Repeat until you have your 4 large, colorful diamonds. (I chose yellows, greens, pinks, and blues for mine.)

6) Now, look at your available blocks and choose pairs that are similar colors (2 solids, 2 blocks each). Use these to make a total of 6 small diamonds (mine are purple, orange, blue, red-orange, teal, and red.) Place around your large diamonds, matching the grays so large gray diamonds are created.

These are the small diamonds….
The small diamond and the large diamonds.
Only four large diamonds are colored, and the center large diamond is gray.
100_6332

7) Use your remaining half-square triangle blocks to fill in the edges, creating small diamond halves. (These will help “frame” out some more large gray diamonds.) This is where you’ll be able to use your colors that don’t match any of the others. You’ll have 9 of these, total.

Here’s a rough worksheet if you prefer to break out the colored pencils.
For me, it’s easiest to just use the actual blocks to work out the pattern.

8) Are you happy with your color arrangement? Rearrange color groups until you get the rainbow effect you like. This is a good time to check that all of your diamonds are facing the way you want them to (see small red-orange diamond in the first photo, which I turned clockwise before sewing).

9) Sew together blocks, starting with large diamond formations. It’s important to make sure these line up correctly. Once you’ve sewn a large diamond section together, work on the next section, until you have four large sections. Join the pieces together to complete the quilt top.

10) Piece together a quilt back and prep batting. To quilt this, I used contrasting thread (pink and yellow), and set my sewing machine to its widest seam allowance setting, tracing around the colored diamonds (large and small) and sewing only on the gray. Gray thread works too! My binding was pieced together from Kona solids scraps, and I chose pink thread.

Diamonds mini quilt

Fresh Picks for Wednesday, 5.4.11

It’s time for this week’s Fresh Picks! If you’d like to be considered for a future spotlight here at Craft Buds, we invite you to submit your project, business tips or craft tutorials here.

Embroidery Thread @ Clover and Violet

Embroidery 101: Perle 8, Perle 5? Jennie from Clover and Violet shares what she’s learned about different widths of embroidery thread. Just in case you wanted to know, but were too embarrassed to ask. :)

Starflower Block Tutorial

Rainbow Brite: Jennifer at Ellison Lane Quilts shows off her gorgeous Starflower Block Tutorial. It’s a step-by-step guide that’s easy to follow, even if you’ve never sewn half-square triangles!

 

Not You at a Craft Show

Craft Show Tips: Tania has created an awesome Craft Show Survival Kit on her blog, DFW Craft Shows. Check out Part I and Part II for a full “packing list” of the essentials you’ll want to take with you on the road this summer, like safety pins and double-stick tape.

Bridal Veil Tutorial
Post Royal Wedding: Transform tulle and a headband into a bridal veil for a little girl. See the cute-torial at Mummy Crafts.

B is for Boy

Flower Child: Speaking of mom, have you figured out what you’re making her for Mother’s Day in four days? We love this photo flower pot wrap at B is for Boy!


Giveaways Roundup
Visit the Craft Buds Giveaway Roundup, with 26 current giveaways to enter! It’s updated each week, and you are always welcome to link up your craft supplies or handmade giveaways.

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