Tag Archive for how to sew a bag

Car Trash Bag / Reusable Lunch Bag

Car Trash Bag

I find that the car is never more cluttered than when filled with wrappers, empty drink bottles and waste from a summer road trip. I try to pick up all the trash I can when I can, but sometimes straw wrappers, bottle caps and food receipts literally take over.

Enter the car trash bag! The sturdy bag is built to carry odds and ends, so you can just fill it up and dump the contents when you stop to refuel. The trash bag is unlined  (see note below if you’d like to add a lining) with the interior covered in interfacing for durability. Simply toss the bag into the washing machine when it’s ready to be cleaned.

Materials:

– 1/2 yard home decor weight fabric (shown here in Joel Dewberry Heirloom)

– 14″ cut of medium-weight fusible interfacing (like Pellon 808)

– Matching thread, iron, scissors, sewing machine and pins

Cut fabric and interfacing

From both fabric and interfacing, cut two pieces 14″ x 11″ and remove a square 2.25″ x 2.25″ from bottom two corners of each piece. Adhere interfacing to lining with iron.

Mark handles

From fabric, cut two pieces 11″ x 6″ for handle lining. Place one handle lining fabric on top of bag fabric, right sides facing. Use ruler to mark dots 2″ from top of bag at the 3.5″ and 7.5″ marks. Move ruler down to 3″ from top of bag and again mark dots at the 3.5″ and 7.5″ marks. Connect dots into a rectangle for bag handle.

Stitch and cut handles

Pin pieces together and stitch on top of line to create handle. Use scissors to snip almost into the corners and down the center line through all layers of fabric.

Flip handle fabric inside out

Now for the magic part. Push the handle lining fabric through the slot you just created and pull it through the other side. Press and pin handle lining flat against inside of tote. Secure with zig-zag stitch, and trim excess fabric away from handle lining (see below).

Attach handle to other side of bag.

Note: If you’d like to make a lining for the bag, cut lining fabric in the same dimensions as your outer fabric, follow the same instructions to make handles and sew the lining, then refer to Tote Bag Tutorial for instructions on inserting your lining. Line up handles of outer and lining fabric and hand-stitch together.

Pin bag front and back right sides together

Next, pin bag front and back right sides together, avoiding the corners or the top of the bag. Stitch 1/4″ from the edges along left and right sides of bag and bottom (center only, not corners yet).

Pinch together corners of bag

Pinch together the corners of your bag, so the seams on the bottom and sides of the bag line up. I like to iron my seams open.

Pin and stitch corners

Pin together the matching edges and stitch 1/4″ from edge. (You can see more photos of this method on our Tote Bag Tutorial).

Fold under rim and pin

Turn bag right side out and push out corners. To finish top edge, use pinking shears or zig zag stitch along top edge to prevent fraying. Then fold top edge down so it lines up with handle cutout without being visible from the outside. Pin fold in place along top edge of bag, and use zig zag or straight stitch to fix top fold in place.

Reusable Lunch Bag

And there you have it–just grab your bag and go! The car trash bag also doubles as a reusable lunch bag in a pinch. Or, fill it with summer essentials like a snack and sunscreen for trips to the park, beach or playground.

Reusable Lunch Bag

If you use this tutorial, we’d love to see your bag in the Craft Buds Flickr pool. This post is part of the Summer Sewing Contest, so check out the blog hop for more projects inspired by the season and enter your own June 10-17 at at Ellison Lane Quilts for a chance to win prizes!

Book Review: Sew Serendipity Bags

Yesterday we were lucky enough to interview pattern designer and author Kay Whitt (and there’s a giveaway of the book at the end of the interview!). Her first book was Sew Serendipity: Fresh and Pretty Designs to Make and Wear and she just recently released Sew Serendipity Bags. I had the pleasure of receiving a copy to review and make a project from!

The layout of the book is nicely divided up into skill level so you can choose between Simple, Intermediate, and Challenging. It was fun to look through all the projects but I appreciated knowing what I was getting into based on the skill level rating. The book is spiral bound so it easily lays flat and has a nice sturdy envelope of full size pattern pieces in the back. There is a wide variety of patterns and styles so you may not love everything in the book but you’ll definitely find some favorites. Projects include a lunch bucket bag, cross-body purses, duffel bag, ruffle hobo bag, backpack, diaper bag, laptop messenger bag and many more.

The introduction of the book includes techniques  on sewing, working with hardware, and working with stabilizers so you’ll have all the knowledge you need as you make the patterns. There are a total of 12 patterns. Many of the patterns offer different size options.

Once you choose a pattern, the instructions clearly tell you what fabric you’ll need along with any other materials (marking pencil, safety pin, etc.). There’s also a handy list for each pattern telling you the finished dimensions of the bag. Each pattern shows you Kay’s initial hand drawn sketch on the first page. Then in the following pages there are hand drawn illustrations for many of the steps. For example, the Green Grocery Bag (you can see my version below) has a total of 22 illustrations.

 

My Project

I chose to make the Green Grocery Bag in small. I liked that even though it was in the “simple” category it had some nice details. The bottom of the bag is finished with a French seam and is completely lined (including the pocket) so the final product looks great and is durable. The bag can be folded up into the pocket for easy storage and has a loop to put around your wrist. The sides of the bag have pleats so it’s nice and roomy.

I found the many illustrations extremely helpful so I always had a visual reference as I was making the bag. The instructions are very detailed. I did have to re-read each step of the instructions a few times to make sure I completely understood what to do next. All in all, I think my bag turned out well and I look forward to using it! (And if you’re wondering, the exterior floral fabric is from a vintage sheet and although you can’t see it, the interior is a green fabric with white polka dots.)

 

Free Pattern

Want to check out more of the book AND get a free pattern? Head on over to Sew Mama Sew where they’re offering PDF pattern and instructions for the Lunch Bucket Bag!

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