Tag Archive for modern quilt

Playing Cards Quilt in Safari Moon Fabrics

Playing Cards Quilt

Hello, and welcome to my stop on the Safari Moon Blog Hop! I am so happy to share my latest quilty finish, which I made from a new line from designer Frances Newcombe and Art Gallery Fabrics.

Frances Newcombe: Safari Moon

Before I dive in, I have to say that Frances Newcombe is a lovely person, and I had the privilege to meet her at Quilt Market in October. I fell in love with her Safari Moon booth, where we chatted a bit about fabric and babies (I was very pregnant at the time). She is a mom to an adorable little guy and we’ve become Instagram friends since!

Playing Cards Quilt

The quilt pattern I used is called “Playing Cards” and it was designed by Jennifer of Ellison Lane Quilts for my book, Modern Bee: 13 Quilts to Make with Friends. I chose this pattern because it has large blocks, which I thought would be perfect for showing off the variety of prints. I also chose it because it’s goes together fairly quickly and is a manageable size to quilt on my home machine.

Playing Cards Quilt

When it came time to quilt this project, I ran into some issues with my free-motion foot. Breaking thread, tension issues . . . it wasn’t pretty. Time to visit the sewing machine doctor! I compromised by switching to my walking foot and quilting organic wavy lines. I’m really happy with the texture that resulted (and can’t wait to see how crinkly it looks coming out of the washer/dryer).

Playing Cards Quilt

When I saw this collection at Quilt Market, I immediately fell in love with the rich, saturated colors. I tend to stick with very dull colors in my own home and wardrobe, but when it comes to quilting fabric . . . the brighter, the better!

Playing Cards Quilt

I joined four different fabrics together to sew a scrappy binding. It’s actually, my first binding made from multiple fabrics. I tend to use a single solid fabric for my bindings, but I’m really happy with how this scrappy version turned out!

Playing Cards Quilt

My favorite print in the collection is the stamped leaf motif, shown in both green and blue. I could see this print as a really cute summer dress or bag.

Playing Cards Quilt

The background fabric is FreeSpirit Designer Solids Cream. For the quilt back, I used a Parson Gray print I’ve been holding onto from a huge fabric sale. I bought 4 yards, so I may have enough for another small quilt back!

Playing Cards Quilt

Thank you Frances for including me on the Safari Moon Blog Hop!

For your chance to win a fat quarter bundle of
Safari Moon, head over to the giveaway post!

bloghop-button

Follow along with the rest of the blog hop to see more projects made with this stunning fabric!

2/24  Faith Jones  Fresh Lemons Quilts

2/25    Lindsay Conner   Lindsay Sews / Craft Buds

2/26   Sarah Lawson  Sew Sweetness

2/27  Cristy Fincher   Sew Much Like Mom

2/28   Amy Smart  Diary of a Quilter

3/3  Lee Heinrich Freshly Pieced

3/4  Teri Harlan Sew Fantastic

3/5  Jane Davidson Quilt Jane

3/6  Lynne Goldsworthy Lily’s Quilts

3/7  Sandy Whitelaw  Upstairs Hobby Room

3/10  Katy Jones  Imagingermonkey

3/11  Victoria Findlay Wolfe  Victoria Findlay Wolfe Quilts

3/12  Megan Bohr Canoe Ridge Creations

all

Lindsay’s Quilt: Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along

Happy New Year! Since I’m still waiting on the baby to arrive, I decided to distract myself with some simple sewing.

Last August, I asked my charity quilting bee if they’d like to make blocks from Modern Bee. Surprise! It’s January, and I still haven’t had a moment to assemble the blocks into a quilt until now. Thankfully, I haven’t fallen behind on any other sewing projects.

I didn’t know at the time I chose this block that I’d be hosting the Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along, but I thought the January/Mosaic Tiles would be a great choice for my bee, since we work from scrap fabrics in everyone’s stash!

Since the prints would be mixed and matched, I chose a color scheme of bright pinks, oranges and yellows with a white background. I grabbed my color inspiration from this beautiful block I spotted on Flickr.

There are some lessons I learned through making this quilt again with a bee, and I thought I’d share some helpful tips!

1. If you are like me and don’t think you’ll be able to sew the blocks together right away, you might have better luck asking your group to press the seams to one side rather than pressing them open. I routinely press my seams open, but noticed that the blocks that arrived to me with seams pressed to the side had better staying power, while the open-pressed seams had started to unravel after six months of being stashed away.

2. Depending on your bee members’ desired seam allowance (I recommend using a scant 1/4″ seam), you might end up with some blocks that are smaller than 11″ unfinished. This is generally okay, because you should be able to stretch the blocks by at least 1/4″ as needed to join the blocks. If they blocks are much smaller though, you might have to supplement them with blocks of your own.

3. Ask your bee members to send you any extra fabric quadrants. These can be assembled quickly into new or replacement blocks!

4. This is a very forgiving quilt pattern! There is so much activity going on, that no one will notice if you have a few blocks that arrive a little wonky.

For this alternate quilt layout, I chose to use 20 blocks in a 4-by-5 grid. There is no sashing in this version, which yields a lap-size quilt. I am really happy with how it turned out, and can’t wait to share the finished quilt with you in the next month or so.

To join the new list for reminders on the Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along schedule, you may sign up for quilt along updates here! For those of you who have already commented on a post and asked to sign up, I’ve added your e-mail address to a special mailing list for Quilt Along participants. Either way, you are welcome to grab a book and join us for the quilt along at any time.

Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along This post is part of the Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along, which you can read about here! You can enter your project any time between now and February 14, 2014 for a chance to win some great prizes. We hope you’ll join us in this beginner-friendly and stress-free quilt along.

Craft Book Month: Lindsay Sews + 13 Spools

Happy Friday the 13th! No doom and gloom here . . . we’re just popping by to share a couple more blog hop projects for Craft Book Month 2013!

Speaking of 13, have you met Amy of 13 Spools? She has a lovely blog with free quilt patterns, sew alongs and more! Amy is a friend of mine from the Indianapolis Modern Quilt Guild, and today she’s sharing her project from Vanessa Christenson’s book Make it Sew Modern (Martingale). I am in love with the fluffy texture of this Spring-Blossom wreath. Doesn’t it look just like frosting on a wedding cake?

 

Read more about how Amy made her wreath (hot glue, anyone?) on her blog!

 

I’m sharing a behind-the-scenes look at my “Baseball Curves” quilt, made for the book Modern Bee — 13 Quilts to Make with Friends (Stash Books) over at my other blog! Find out what color I chose for the binding… and then ripped off completely to start over. :) You can also comment over there to win a copy of the book before it releases on Amazon.

 

Visit Lindsay Sews >> Enter the giveaway!

Square in Square Quilt Block (Paper Piecing Tutorial)

I recently made a quilt block for my do. Good Stitches charity bee, and I had so much fun making this block. So, I decided to take photos and put together a square in square quilt block tutorial!

Tutorial for a Square in Square quilt block (paper pieced)

This is a paper-pieced (foundation pieced) quilt block pattern that works great with all kinds of fabrics. You can use these blocks to make a pretty paper-pieced pillow, a whole quilt or just make one block to practice your paper piecing.

PTS6

This is a pillow made using the same square in square block pattern, made by Tamiko of Patchwork Notes! She has put together a free paper-piecing pattern for this block, which you can download here.

Foundation Piecing Tips

Here are a few things to remember when sewing foundation-pieced blocks:

  1. Print out your foundation pattern once for each block you’d like to make. For the 8 blocks pictured, I printed off 8 sheets! I used regular computer paper.
  2. Shorten your stitch length to 1 or 1.3. This will allow you to tear off the paper easily when you’re done sewing.
  3. Place your fabric on the non-printed side of the paper. The pretty side of the fabric should face out toward you.
  4. When sewing a foundation pieced quilt block, always sew directly through the paper on the printed side of the paper. The fabric will be underneath the paper as you stitch, so use a glue stick and/or pins to hold it in place.
  5. For another little primer on how foundation piecing works, you can visit my New York Beauty block tutorial! Once you get used to placing fabric on one side of the paper and sewing the other, you should have no problem with this technique.

Square in Square Block Tutorial

Pattern makes a 6″ finished (6.5″ unfinished) block. Download the free template and print one copy for each block you’d like to make.

For each block, cut the following:
– 1 square 3.5″ x 3.5″ for center
– 2 squares 3.5″ x 3.5″ for center ring. Cut squares in half once diagonally to make 4 triangles total.
– 2 squares 4.5″ x 4.5″ for outer ring. Cut squares in half once diagonally to make 4 triangles total.

Here are two of my printed templates, side by side:

1. To make 1 block, take the 3.5″ x 3.5″ fabric for your center square. Place it on the wrong side of your paper, so the edges overlap the edges of the center box on your printout. You can hold up your paper to the window to see the lines. Use a glue stick to dab just a dot of glue to hold the fabric in place.

2. Next, take two of your triangles (cut diagonally from the smaller 3.5″ squares), and place them right side down on the fabric square as pictured. Align the long straight edges of your triangles with the top and bottom of the square. Center and pin in place. (The photo to the right shows what it will look like after stitching.)

3. Flip the paper and take it to your sewing machine so the printout is facing up at you. Peek under your paper to make sure the fabric has not shifted, and stitch the two lines where you’ve pinned the wide end of your triangles. Backstitch at end edge.

4. Open up the triangles you’ve just sewn and press. Repeat by pinning the long edge of two triangles to the opposite sides, taking the paper to your sewing machine, and stitching along the left and right sides of your center square.

5. Here’s what the triangles will look like stitched. Again, fold the triangles open and press with your iron.

6. Next, it’s time to trim! Take the block to your cutting mat. With the printed side of the paper facing up, fold along one of the diamond edges (diagonal lines) as pictured.

7. Fold the paper corner completely down, so you see the edges of fabric poking out. Lay your ruler on top of the paper, and measure out 1/4″ from the edge of the paper. Trim the fabric that pokes out past a 1/4″ seam.

8. Unfold the paper corner, and repeat with the other 3 corners to trim each of the edges.

9. Here is what the block looks like trimmed. So pretty!

10. Since I was making 8 blocks, I went ahead and assembled the centers and first row of triangles up to this point. You can see that I left the papers full-size, but you may wish to trim yours at this point or before getting started! Just be sure to leave on the outer printed border, which is the seam allowance.


11. To make the outer border, take two of the triangles cut diagonally from your 4.5″ squares. Pin the long edges of each triangle along the top and bottom of your patchwork square (pictured, left). Stitch in place along the printed lines. Press the triangles open.

12. Take your final two triangles, and pin the long edges along the left and right sides of your patchwork square (pictured, right).


13. Stitch in place. For this entire step, you will be stitching around the lines of the diamond (the second shape from the center), as pictured.

14. Press the entire block. Get excited, because you are almost done!


15. Flip the block over, so the paper side is facing you. Trim along the edges of the paper, again leaving the 1/4″ seam allowance all the way around the edge.

16. Flip over the paper and admire your pretty square in square quilt block!

17. When you are joining your blocks, it’s helpful to leave the paper on. I know… it seems funny. But it makes it very easy to get an accurate seam allowance and line up all the points.

18. All of your previous seams will naturally be pressed to the sides. For the seams between each block, I like to press the seams open.

do. Good Stitches {imagine} April for Toni

I can’t wait to see the quilt that Toni makes from these charity blocks! If you make any blocks based on this or any of our tutorials, we’d love to see them! Please add them to the Craft Buds Flickr group or share a link in the comments.

Have you tried foundation piecing or another type of paper piecing before? What’s your favorite method (or tools and tricks) of paper piecing?

Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

Book Cover: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

My friend Jennifer at Ellison Lane Quilts recently sent me a review copy of the book Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe. She has a quilt included in the book, along with some other great quilting bloggers!

TOC: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

This book has 19 quilts from different contributors, which means it is wonderfully diverse. Some quilts are minimalistic in design and others use many blocks. Some quilts show off solids and others are heavy with prints. What ties them all together is the love of quilting and blogging that is shared by each of the designers.

Spotted Stones: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

“Everything’s Coming Up Rainbows” is a quilt by Krista Fleckenstein of Spotted Stones. I got the chance to meet Krista briefly at QuiltCon, and she is lovely! I love her modern take on a bento box quilt block.

Olive + Ollie: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

Heather Jones of Olive and Ollie shares the pattern for her “Silo” quilt in this book, which offers a really beautiful use of solids and repetition across the quilt. What a lovely project!

Freshly Pieced: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

Lee Heinrich of Freshly Pieced is the designer behind “Candy Necklace,” a pattern that would look really beautiful in solids or monochromatic prints. I’m really drawn to the vertical orientation of this quilt, and how it appears to be not really “blocks” but strips.

I’m a huge fan of collaborative sewing and quilting books, because they allow a group of contributors to join forces and share their very best work! If you follow many quilting blogs, you may have seen some of these quilts already on the Web; however, I don’t believe I’ve seen them with the full patterns. There are several quilts in this book I would consider making.

Back: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

In fact, my only real criticism of the book is that it reminded me of something. It made me realize how prone we all are (myself included) to view and refer to well-known quilting bloggers “stars.” I certainly respect the hard work it takes to design a quilt, write the pattern and maintain a regular blog presence in the midst of the rest of life! Quilting and blogging have become two of my greatest passions in life, and I can let hours and hours go by without noticing what time it is when I become lost in a project.

However, one thing I’ve learned from meeting some blog friends in real life is that people are just people! They are real… they have struggles. They have joys. There are some incredibly talented designers that have never had their pattern published in a book or magazine. They have never displayed their quilt in a show. I’d love to challenge the idea that having a popular blog with lots of comments makes someone a star.

Quilters are some of the nicest, most genuine people on the planet! I don’t wish to take away any joy from the quilters featured in this book or those who put it together, because I myself love the feeling of sending a project off the be published. It’s exhilarating! However, I was recently reminded how beautiful life can be when we realize that there is room at the table for all of us. You are right where you are supposed to be. It’s not about competition, or who is “in” and who is out.

If quilting becomes about winning a ribbon, what is it good for? If making becomes about seeking attention or watching the “Likes” build up, what is the point?

What brings us together, creative bloggers, is a shared love for creating. That’s it. That is why I love this online community! I hope to be reminded of these things when I forget them myself.

Thank you to Martingale & Company for putting together this beautiful collection of quilts. With 19 patterns in versatile designs, Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe is a welcome addition to my bookshelf!

Ellison Lane Quilts: Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe

Giveaway!

Want to win a copy of Modern Quilts from the Blogging Universe?

Head over to Ellison Lane Quilts (that’s her quilt in the book, above!) by Sunday, 3/17 for your chance to win a hard copy of the book. Giveaway open to U.S. residents only.

Jungle Lattice: Free Baby Quilt Pattern

Lattice - Free Baby Quilt Pattern

I’ve been on a kick with baby quilts lately. I’ve put together a free baby quilt pattern that’s totally doable for beginners and intermediate quilters, too!

This baby quilt tutorial uses charm squares (5″ x 5″ precut squares, which you can also cut from other fabric in your stash) and crisp, white sashing, for an effect that looks like a lattice fence, with pops of bright color popping through! I chose “jungle colors” with a pop of brightness to match a baby boy’s nursery, but you can customize this pattern and colors to fit the size and look of your preferred quilt. Bright, monochromatic (all one color) prints look great with this quilt pattern, and the white lattice really brightens up whatever colors you choose.

I hope you enjoy this free baby quilt pattern! Let’s get started.

Lattice - Free Baby Quilt Pattern Finished Quilt Size: Approx. 40″ x 48″

Materials:

– 40 fabric squares 5″ x 5″ (5 each of 8 assorted prints)
– 1 3/4 yards of white fabric for sashing, corner and side triangles and border
– 3/8  yard of binding fabric
– 1 1/2 yards backing fabric
– 44″ x 52″ batting

Cutting Instructions:

– Cut 10 strips 1 1/2″ x WOF  (width of fabric / selvage to selvage) for sashing (the lattice).
– Cut 4 white squares 9″, and cut each in half TWICE diagonally to make 16 quarter-square triangles.
– Cut 1 white square 7 1/2″, and cut in half ONCE diagonally to make 2 half-square triangles.
– Cut 4 strips 3 1/2″ x WOF for borders.
– Cut 5 strips 2 1/2″ x WOF for binding.

All seams are 1/4″ and pressed open, unless otherwise noted.

1) Chain stitch your charm squares to the white sashing strips, sewing them onto the white strip one after another. Don’t worry about leaving much space between them, because you will later cut them apart. Leave 8 squares without a white strip. You should be able to sew 8 squares each onto 4 strips, for a total of 32 squares with a border, and 8 squares without a border strip.

 

2) Cut apart the charm squares, trimming the white side borders equal with the sides of the square.

 

3) Arrange your charm squares on point (like a diamond) in a color arrangement that’s pleasing to you, with the white stripes resting between adjacent blocks. If you used a design wall to arrange the blocks, you can refer to a photo for block orientation. Arrange the squares without the stripes toward the ends of the rows, as pictured.

 

4) Stitch together the rows as pictured:

Row 1: 2 squares / 1 strip
Row 2:
4 squares / 3 strips
Row 3: 6 squares / 5 strips
Row 4:
8 squares / 7 strips
Row 5:
8 squares / 7 strips

Row 6:
6 squares / 5 strips

Row 7: 4 squares / 3 strips

Row 8:
2 squares / 1 strip


5) Arrange the white half-square triangles at the ends of each row, to make the quilt rectangular in shape. The long side of each triangle should face out toward the border of the quilt top. Stitch the triangles to the rows.

 

6) Place the larger rectangles in opposite corners of the quilt, with the long side of the triangles facing the pairs of two squares. Stitch the triangles to the two wide corners.

 

7) Trim the sides of the corner triangles even with a ruler and rotary cutter.

 

8 ) Lay out your remaining sashing strips between each row, and stitch to between neighboring rows to join them. Sew the longer strips first. Trim the excess sashing strips and join them to other strips to get the length you need.

 

9) Continue adding sashing strips to the rows, pressing your seams as you go. I pressed the seams open, which gives this quilt a crisp, clean look with sharp angles.

 

10) Add a 3 1/2″ border to the left and right sides of your quilt. Trim off the excess. Add a 3 1/2″ border to the top and bottom of your quilt. Trim. Press the seams toward the border.

 

11) Baste and quilt your baby quilt. Trim the borders even around the edges of the quilt, measuring 3″ from the seam. Sew on binding.

Lattice Baby Quilt

I chose wide, wavy lines and a slight woodgrain pattern for quilting this baby quilt. I would have added an extra layer of quilting between each of the wavy lines to make it tighter and more textured, but I ran out of white thread and was on a deadline. I am excited that this quilt gets to stay in the family! It’s fun to sew for people you know, isn’t it?

Lattice - Free Baby Quilt Pattern

I hope you enjoyed this free baby quilt pattern and photo tutorial. If you make this or any projects from Craft Buds, we’d love to see them in the Craft Buds Flickr group!

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt

If you are looking for a crib-size quilt top that you can piece together in one evening, this half-square triangles quilt pattern is perfect for you. It features 6 fat quarters of assorted fabric prints and large, 8″ x 8″ half-square triangles (HSTs), that you can make 8 at a time.

Finished Quilt Size: 38″ x 53″

Fabric Requirements:

- 6 fat quarters (18″ x 22″) of coordinating fabric prints
- 5/8 yard white border fabric
- 1 1/2 yards backing fabric
- 3/8 yard binding fabric
- Crib size (45″ x 60″) quilt batting
To get started, break your fat quarters into three sets that match well together. Look at the colors as well as the scale or size of the design.

Spread out and stack two of your fat quarters, and trim to an 18″ x 18″ square.

Now, stack your 18″ x 18″ squares with right sides facing. Mark a diagonal line from corner to corner on one wrong side with a ruler and pen. Pin together the fabric squares at the corners to hold the fabric in place while you sew.

Take your fabric to the sewing machine. With the marked side facing up, stitch a line 1/4″ from the edge of one marked line, to both the left and right of that line. Repeat with the other marked line.
After you’ve stitched the four long lines, notice how the stitch lines go right through the center of the block. With your ruler and rotary cutter, cut the block into four equal quadrants using this center and the block’s straight edges as your guide. For more tricks on making HSTs at a time, visit my guest post at Sew Mama Sew.

Use your ruler and rotary cutter to cut along the line you marked earlier, through the center of your stitched lines. Repeat with the other blocks, and you’ll have 8 half square triangles.

Press the seams open with an iron.

Using a square ruler and your rotary cutter, trim each block to 8″ square. Line up the 45-degree line of your ruler with your half square triangle before you cut.

Here are the eight 8″ half square triangle blocks from just two fat quarters. Repeat with the other fat quarters, and you should have 24 total blocks.

Arrange your blocks in a 4×6 grid. I kept my blocks in a set order, with the colors pointing to the upper-left and the grays pointing to the lower-right.

With right sides facing, pin together the blocks in each row and stitch. Press the seams open.
Next, join together the rows with right sides facing, and pin at each seam. Stitch together the rows and press the seams open.

To make the border, cut your border fabric 5″ x the width of fabric, for 4 strips total. Starting in one corner, attach a border strip to the top, then trim the excess. Repeat with the bottom. Stitch the ends of these strips to the other to border strips you’ve cut for the sides, to lengthen them. Press the seams open, then stitch the left and right border strips to the quilt and trim.

Quick Triangles Baby Quilt

Press the seams open. Baste, quilt and bind as desired. After quilting and before binding, I trimmed the borders to 4 1/4″ to keep them even all the way around. This pattern is very beginner-friendly, and I’d recommend it for showing off strong prints. I hope you’ve enjoyed my tutorial, which I originally posted at Sew Lux Fabric!

Something New Sampler Quilt Along

something new sampler header

Looking for your next project?

Resolved to learn some new sewing skills this year?

Want to win some great prizes?

Then join in the blog hop for The Something New Sampler! Each week, one or two bloggers will present a block tutorial with an uncommonly used technique. There will be a total of 9 blocks presented. And, just to mix it up, we’re going with a funky modern block size: 7″ x 14″! We’ll have plenty of suggestions on how to use this block shape along the way. There’s no need for our modern blocks to always be square :)

Here’s our schedule:

Jan 14th
Amy @ thecutelifesmiles.blogspot.com | Bargello piecing

Jan 21st
Heidi @ buttonsandbutterflies.com | folding
Chelsea @ pinsandbobbins.blogspot.co.uk | a scraptastic technique

Jan 28th
Lindsay @ lindsaysews.com | reverse applique

Feb 4th
M-R @ quiltmatters.blogspot.com | trapunto
Heidi @ fabricmutt.blogspot.com | cathedral windows

Feb 11th
Alyssa @ pileofabric.com | pinless curves
Becky @ myfabricobsession.blogspot.com | machine applique

And stop by the cute life on Fridays for tips and tutorials on how to set these rectangular blocks! Posts will be up on the following dates: Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1, Feb 8, Feb 15

Be sure to join the flickr group to keep up with the hop, the chatter, and some inspirational photos.

Prizes!

At the end, link up a blog post or flickr photo with anything you’ve done from the sampler series, even if it’s just one block! There are two categories for prizes:

1) Finished projects: Winners will be chosen by popular vote. “Finished” includes an entirely completed smaller project, like a pillow, table runner, mini quilt, etc. Pieced quilt tops also count as “finished”, even if not quilted.

2) Participation prizes: Winners will be chosen by a random number generator. Link up any progress you’ve made!

Prizes for the Something New Sampler

 

Fort Worth Fabric Studio is an online fabric shop with yardage and some fantastic custom bundles you won’t find anywhere else! One of these bundles - the Lagoon bundle – is a prize, and it is centered around Michael Miller’s Lagoon line, with 18 fat quarters. You can also sign up for their newsletter to be eligible for a monthly prize. In addition to the bundle, they are also offering a $25 gift certificate.

Cotton Blossom Farm stocks great designer fabrics with plenty of modern options. One great feature of this website is the ability to search through fabrics based on categories such as color – it’s just like shopping in a brick and mortar shop! You have the chance to win a set of ten 1/2 yards (of your choosing!) of Simply Color from them.

Fat Quarter Shop is another online shop that sells yardage and precuts of some of the most popular fabrics. They offer next day shipping and have an incredibly large selection! Fat Quarter Shop also has a great selection of other items, such as books, magazines, and kits. They have generously donated a jelly roll of Paris Flea Market and an Amy Butler pattern for prizes.

Sew Me a Song is an Etsy shop that stocks Japanese and contemporary fabrics. Becca puts together some fabulous bundles of texty prints, polka dots, and – of course! – lots of Melody Miller prints. Don’t miss the great collection of Type by Julia Rothman. She has created two custom bundles especially for our sampler event, one with six texty fat quarters and one with eight japanese prints.

Book Review: Modern Designs for Classic Quilts

Today, we are excited to have a guest post from Elizabeth, with a review of the book Modern Designs for Classic Quilts. Take it away Elizabeth!

Happy Thanksgiving Craft Buds friends! I’m Elizabeth from Inspire Me Grey, and on this day of traditions and celebrations, it seems like the perfect time for a little review of the new quilting book Modern Designs for Classic Quilts by Kelly Biscopink and Andrea Johnson. With this book, Kelly and Andie celebrate traditional quilt designs by giving them new twists in modern fabrics, layouts and creative designs.

Full disclosure: This in no way affects my feelings about the book, but Kelly is a friend of mine – like, a real-life friend and not just a blogland friend. We go way back – to birth, really. Her parents are my godparents, and Kelly and I overlapped a couple of years at the same university. It was fantastic to discover that we have quilting in common, and I’m thrilled to review her (and Andie’s) book for Craft Buds.

So back to the review. I really like the “hook” of this book. Some quilting books are just patterns and projects with no common thread to really hold them together. What makes this one special is the connection of classic designs done in new ways. Kelly and Andie take things like flying geese, coins, hexagons and Dresden plates and do some really cool things with them. They also provide a great primer on basic techniques, including this split-screen of how they each handle matching straight seams differently. (No pretending that everyone does it all one way here! Yes, you have options!)

My personal favorites (and recent additions to my “must make” list) include this spotty kaleidoscope pattern and Andie’s Midtown Girl:

I took the book with me on vacation last week and my mom picked these Dresden plates as her faves:

Full disclosure: Elizabeth is a real-life friend of mine, and she is not kidding about this book. I’ve also take a look, and this has to be one of my favorite quilting books of the year. Love the quilts, fabric, patterns, illustrations . . . It’s a must have!

Hop over to Elizabeth’s blog to see a quilt-in-progress from the book.

Blog Tour!

Monday, 11/5 Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Tuesday, 11/6 Lindsay of CraftBuds
Wednesday, 11/7 Jill of Darling Jill Quilts
Thursday, 11/8 Faith of Fresh Lemons
Friday, 11/9 Tracy of Generation Q
Saturday, 11/10 Angela of Quilting is my Therapy
Sunday, 11/11 Shannon of Stitch Craft Create
Monday, 11/12 Laurie of Scarlet Fig
Tuesday, 11/13 Kaysie of KZJo’s Studio
Wednesday, 11/14 Jessica of A Little Gray
Thursday, 11/15 Mary of The Tulip Patch
Friday, 11/16 Deborah of Whipstitch
Saturday, 11/17 Lindsay of The Cottage Mama
Sunday, 11/18 Jenny of Sew Kind of Wonderful
Monday, 11/19 Carla of LollyQuiltz
Tuesday, 11/20 Thomas of Thomas Knauer Sews
Wednesday, 11/21 Brenda of Pink Castle Fabrics
Thursday, 11/22 Lindsay & Liz Rea of CraftBuds & Inspire Me Grey
Friday, 11/23 Sarah of The Last Piece
Saturday, 11/24 Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Cara of Cara Quilts

Modern Designs for Classic Quilts + Giveaway!

Today, we are continuing the fun of Craft Book Month with a Q&A from two authors of a modern quilting book that you are going to love! Kelly Biscopink and Andrea Johnson are co-authors of the new release Modern Designs for Classic Quilts: 12 Traditionally Inspired Patterns Made New (F+W Media). We are thrilled to help them kick of the blog tour of their book, which begins today.

Ladies, congratulations on the release of your new quilting book! How did you both meet, and can you tell me a little bit about your blogging and how that played a role?

Andie: I work at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in the Bone Marrow Transplant unit. Kelly works at the College of Charleston’s Sottile Theatre. The two of us met through the Cincinnati Modern Quilt Guild and became fast friends. It was just one of those instant connections!

We both have the same love of traditional quilts but are really excited about the modern scene that’s been booming over the last few years. We do have blogs (AndieJohnsonSews and Stitchy Quilt Stuff) and enjoy them as both a creative outlet and a way to expand our sewing circle of friends. Our blogs have given us a voice in the sewing community, and we love being connected to sewists and quilters all over the world.


Can you tell me a little bit about how you got this book idea off the ground?

We were at a sew-in event one Saturday and started talking about why we love quilting, and realized we both had very traditional quilting backgrounds but love the modern aesthetic. The idea for our book was born out of that conversation. A few weeks later over coffee, the book outline was nailed down and we started putting together a proposal. After a lot of back and forth and some crazy twists of fate, it was acquired through F+W Media.

Were there any surprises along the way when it came to the work that goes into writing a book?

Shockingly, the surprises were few. We worked so well with each other, and our editors and our publishing company staff were great at guiding us through each step.

Andie: As far as the projects go – creating pieces that I thought would be scrutinized by quilters who bought the book introduced a tiny sliver of self-doubt. I’m used to creating what I want when I want to please me, so when going through this, I put a lot of pressure on myself, which kinda sucked some of the joy out of the process. But overall, it was a pretty amazing experience.

Kelly: Coming from an editorial background, it was fascinating being on the “other side” of the writing process. I had no idea how personal this book would be, how much I would agonize over it. I also can’t even tell you how surprisingly emotional it was to see the book for the first time!

Do you have any advice for someone looking to write a craft book? What lessons have you learned along the way?

Concept is everything. We happened to have an idea that was timely and on trend with what’s going on in the quilting community. We both have experience in writing patterns and we’re been quilting and sewing for years, so we felt confident that we could execute the design, patterns and writing of the book. Also, it really helped that we knew people in the industry.  If you have a great concept with lots of project ideas and can provide examples of your work, submit to a publisher! You never know what can happen.

Blog Tour!

Monday, 11/5    Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Tuesday, 11/6    Lindsay of CraftBuds
Wednesday, 11/7    Jill of Darling Jill Quilts
Thursday, 11/8    Faith of Fresh Lemons
Friday, 11/9    Tracy of Generation Q
Saturday, 11/10    Angela of Quilting is my Therapy
Sunday, 11/11   Shannon of Stitch Craft Create
Monday, 11/12   Laurie of Scarlet Fig
Tuesday, 11/13   Kaysie of KZJo’s Studio
Wednesday, 11/14   Jessica of A Little Gray
Thursday, 11/15   Mary of The Tulip Patch
Friday, 11/16    Deborah of Whipstitch
Saturday, 11/17   Lindsay of  The Cottage Mama
Sunday, 11/18    Jenny of Sew Kind of Wonderful
Monday, 11/19   Carla of LollyQuiltz
Tuesday, 11/20   Thomas of Thomas Knauer Sews
Wednesday, 11/21   Brenda of Pink Castle Fabrics
Thursday, 11/22   Lindsay & Liz Rea of CraftBuds Inspire Me Grey
Friday, 11/23   Sarah of The Last Piece
Saturday, 11/24    Andie & Kelly, AndieJohnsonSews & Stitchy Quilt Stuff
Cara of Cara Quilts

We’ll be back later this month with a book review and a sneak peek at Elizabeth‘s project from the book. If you haven’t taken a look at this book yet, it is gorgeous and the ideal project book for your next sew along!

Giveaway!

F+W Media is generously giving away a copy of Modern Designs for Classic Quilts to one lucky Craft Buds reader! Leave a comment below for your chance to win. For your comment, you can tell us your favorite “traditional” quilt block or pattern. Also, let us know if you might be interested in a sew along for the book. Sounds fun, right?! ;)

We’ll choose one random winner next Monday, November 12, 2012.

Congrats to our winner, #205 Sherri Noel!

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