Tag Archive for paper piecing

Giveaway! Join the 2016 Tribal Block Club with Amy of 13 Spools

We have a really exciting giveaway today! Our friend Amy at 13 Spools has recently launched a new quilt club, which you can join for 2016. Comment at the end of this post for your chance to win a membership (that’s a $39 value), or go sign up now to get the early-bird discount.

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Registration is currently open for the Tribal Block Club!

EEEEEEEEEEK! I’ve been waiting to show you all. I’m so excited! Fully tested, detailed tutorials & quilt patterns, coloring pages, free motion quilting discussions, etc. The whole shebang people. Because I love to teach, love these quilts & blocks, and ….. I mean, that should be enough, right?

Anyway, if you’re looking for your next project, boom it’s here! (And if you’re not, you can always sign up and work on it later!)

If you sign up before January 1st, you’ll get the early bird price of $29. After that, it’s $39. The class starts on the 15th. (Purchase here or keep reading for more details!)

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What you’ll get:

– 6 block tutorials: Each block tutorial will be available in blog post and and PDF format for greatest ease of use. These blocks range in difficulty, giving everyone enjoyment. Each block has been inspired by antique tribal patterns in Navajo & African works.

– 3 quilt top patterns: Don’t know how to use those blocks? Look no further – these three patterns do all the heavy lifting for you. Jump right into a project you love with great tribal flair.

– Endless possibilities: Do you love designing? The blocks are all made with easily combined sizes, making it even easier to design your own projects above & beyond the quilt top patterns provided.

– 18+ weeks of content: You won’t get bored! These projects will last you well into 2016, and even longer should you go on to create your own quilt block combinations. There are three “units” in the club, each lasting 6 weeks and including 2 block tutorials & 1 quilt top pattern. The full content of each unit is released at its start to allow you to go at your own pace. Want to save it all for later? That’s cool, too! You’ll have unlimited access for as long as 13 Spools is here.

– A community: Each tutorial & pattern post will include a linkup for you to enter a photo or blog post of your finished block. Peruse other students’ entries to gain inspiration & offer encouragement. Need more than that? We’ll have a Facebook group just for students to chat all things Tribal Block Club, post WIP photos, and cheer each other on to help forge even deeper relationships & communication.

– Design support: Coloring pages for every block tutorial & quilt top pattern take away any second guessing. Have questions about how to combine blocks for a new quilt top design? Ask away!

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Q & A:

1) How much paper piecing is there? There is only one block that is paper pieced, and it is a very simple block. If you hate paper piecing, don’t worry, you’ll still love this club!

2) How will I receive my content? All content is provided on a members-only section of this website, which you will access with an account you create. You’ll also receive emails every time new content is posted so you won’t have to worry about checking back to see if anything new is available!

3) What if I have a question about one of the tutorials? Simply post your question on the appropriate blog post, email me (13spools@gmail.com), or post your question in the Facebook group – we’ve got you covered!

4) Do you offer shared accounts for groups, such as my local quilt shop, or my guild? Yes! If you are an official guild or brick and mortar shop, you are more than welcome to contact me to chat about group memberships & teaching licenses.

Giveaway!

Leave a comment on this post telling what fabric designer or collection you think would look good with the tribal quilt blocks. I’ll choose one random winner on Jan 4th to win access to the Tribal Block Club for FREE!

If you’ve already purchased, you’ll receive a refund. Don’t delay… the price goes up after January 1st! Sign up here!

 

 

‘Paper Pieced Modern’ Blog Hop + Giveaway!

We are so excited to be sharing a guest post from our friend Amy Garro, who blogs at 13 Spools. Amy is an incredibly talented quilter, and she’s also a great mom who inspires us with her honest and real writing!

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Amy is here to tell us a little bit about the inspiration behind one of the patterns from the book. She’s also sharing some sneak peeks of photos you won’t see in the book’s pages. Let’s learn more about her quilt, Faceted Jewels I, from the soon-to-be-released book Paper Pieced Modern:

Faceted Jewels I flat shot 1a

{Faceted Jewels I, photo by C&T Publishing}

Faceted Jewels I is actually a simplified version of another quilt in the book, pictured here:

Faceted Jewels II flat shot

{Faceted Jewels II, photo by C&T Publishing} I actually designed the purple quilt first. I had more than one variation of this block drawn up, and wanted to use them both!

Faceted Jewels I 7a

The largest pieces in the blue version are actually white (background) pieces in the purple version. It’s fun to see how different a pattern can look with varying color and fabric placement. I placed the fabrics in a way to make the quilt look like it is sparkling. I explain how to create this look in the book with 3 different values of fabrics. Prints from Tula Pink and Parson Gray work together marvelously in this version of project.

Faceted Jewels I 3a

In comparison to the purple version (which is the most difficult pattern in the book), this version does have fewer pieces per block, and significantly fewer blocks in the entire quilt. I really tried to give a variety of projects in this book – some quilts lots of negative space, and some with none at all, simple blocks accessible to even the beginning quilter, and complex blocks for the more advanced quilter. This project has an intermediate-level block, but all of the negative space gives you a reprieve from tons of piecing. But don’t worry, if you’ve never paper pieced before, I offer step-by-step instructions for how to paper piece! I also go through all the tricky pieces you might run into and how to handle them.

Faceted Jewels I 1b

I was a bit stumped on the quilting for this one. Luckily, it was one I sent to Emily of Emerson Quilting. I also sent her links to a number of different quilts that I liked, and she used it as a jumping point to do her own thing. She really does the most fabulous linear quilting! I had her use some Quilter’s Dream cotton batting in deluxe loft. I must say, it’s one of my softest quilts to touch. It really is amazing how big of a difference the batting brand and loft can make.

Faceted Jewels I flat shot 2a

In addition to this pattern, my book has another 12 paper-pieced quilt patterns. No matter what your skill level, you’ll be able to find something that suits you! Here’s a sneak peek of tomorrow’s quilts:

Jumping Jacks 6

Check out the other links on the hop for more chances to win copies of the book, and to see all of the quilts in the book!

Feb 5th – Lindsay @ Lindsay Sews

Feb 6th – Charlotte @ Displacement Activity

Feb 7th – Molli @ Molli Sparkles

Feb 8th – Elise @ Lovelea Designs

Feb 9th – Amy guest posting @ C&T Publishing

Feb 10th – Darcie @ The Seam Allowance

Feb 11th – Christa @ Christa Quilts

Feb 12th – Amy guest posting @ Craft Buds

Feb 13th – Amy @ 13 Spools

Feb 14th – Chelsea @ Patch the Giraffe

Feb 15th – Amy @ During Quiet Time

Feb 16th – Wrap-up post back at 13 Spools

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Giveaway!

Would you like to win a copy of Amy’s new book, Paper Pieced Modern (Stash Books)? Of course you would! Leave a comment on this post telling us if you’ve ever tried paper piecing or if you’d like to learn. One random winner will be chosen a week from the date of this post. (If outside U.S., winner will receive an e-book rather than printed book.

 

The winner is . . .

#62 Anita!

 

Square in Square Quilt Block (Paper Piecing Tutorial)

I recently made a quilt block for my do. Good Stitches charity bee, and I had so much fun making this block. So, I decided to take photos and put together a square in square quilt block tutorial!

Tutorial for a Square in Square quilt block (paper pieced)

This is a paper-pieced (foundation pieced) quilt block pattern that works great with all kinds of fabrics. You can use these blocks to make a pretty paper-pieced pillow, a whole quilt or just make one block to practice your paper piecing.

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This is a pillow made using the same square in square block pattern, made by Tamiko of Patchwork Notes! She has put together a free paper-piecing pattern for this block, which you can download here.

Foundation Piecing Tips

Here are a few things to remember when sewing foundation-pieced blocks:

  1. Print out your foundation pattern once for each block you’d like to make. For the 8 blocks pictured, I printed off 8 sheets! I used regular computer paper.
  2. Shorten your stitch length to 1 or 1.3. This will allow you to tear off the paper easily when you’re done sewing.
  3. Place your fabric on the non-printed side of the paper. The pretty side of the fabric should face out toward you.
  4. When sewing a foundation pieced quilt block, always sew directly through the paper on the printed side of the paper. The fabric will be underneath the paper as you stitch, so use a glue stick and/or pins to hold it in place.
  5. For another little primer on how foundation piecing works, you can visit my New York Beauty block tutorial! Once you get used to placing fabric on one side of the paper and sewing the other, you should have no problem with this technique.

Square in Square Block Tutorial

Pattern makes a 6″ finished (6.5″ unfinished) block. Download the free template and print one copy for each block you’d like to make.

For each block, cut the following:
– 1 square 3.5″ x 3.5″ for center
– 2 squares 3.5″ x 3.5″ for center ring. Cut squares in half once diagonally to make 4 triangles total.
– 2 squares 4.5″ x 4.5″ for outer ring. Cut squares in half once diagonally to make 4 triangles total.

Here are two of my printed templates, side by side:

1. To make 1 block, take the 3.5″ x 3.5″ fabric for your center square. Place it on the wrong side of your paper, so the edges overlap the edges of the center box on your printout. You can hold up your paper to the window to see the lines. Use a glue stick to dab just a dot of glue to hold the fabric in place.

2. Next, take two of your triangles (cut diagonally from the smaller 3.5″ squares), and place them right side down on the fabric square as pictured. Align the long straight edges of your triangles with the top and bottom of the square. Center and pin in place. (The photo to the right shows what it will look like after stitching.)

3. Flip the paper and take it to your sewing machine so the printout is facing up at you. Peek under your paper to make sure the fabric has not shifted, and stitch the two lines where you’ve pinned the wide end of your triangles. Backstitch at end edge.

4. Open up the triangles you’ve just sewn and press. Repeat by pinning the long edge of two triangles to the opposite sides, taking the paper to your sewing machine, and stitching along the left and right sides of your center square.

5. Here’s what the triangles will look like stitched. Again, fold the triangles open and press with your iron.

6. Next, it’s time to trim! Take the block to your cutting mat. With the printed side of the paper facing up, fold along one of the diamond edges (diagonal lines) as pictured.

7. Fold the paper corner completely down, so you see the edges of fabric poking out. Lay your ruler on top of the paper, and measure out 1/4″ from the edge of the paper. Trim the fabric that pokes out past a 1/4″ seam.

8. Unfold the paper corner, and repeat with the other 3 corners to trim each of the edges.

9. Here is what the block looks like trimmed. So pretty!

10. Since I was making 8 blocks, I went ahead and assembled the centers and first row of triangles up to this point. You can see that I left the papers full-size, but you may wish to trim yours at this point or before getting started! Just be sure to leave on the outer printed border, which is the seam allowance.


11. To make the outer border, take two of the triangles cut diagonally from your 4.5″ squares. Pin the long edges of each triangle along the top and bottom of your patchwork square (pictured, left). Stitch in place along the printed lines. Press the triangles open.

12. Take your final two triangles, and pin the long edges along the left and right sides of your patchwork square (pictured, right).


13. Stitch in place. For this entire step, you will be stitching around the lines of the diamond (the second shape from the center), as pictured.

14. Press the entire block. Get excited, because you are almost done!


15. Flip the block over, so the paper side is facing you. Trim along the edges of the paper, again leaving the 1/4″ seam allowance all the way around the edge.

16. Flip over the paper and admire your pretty square in square quilt block!

17. When you are joining your blocks, it’s helpful to leave the paper on. I know… it seems funny. But it makes it very easy to get an accurate seam allowance and line up all the points.

18. All of your previous seams will naturally be pressed to the sides. For the seams between each block, I like to press the seams open.

do. Good Stitches {imagine} April for Toni

I can’t wait to see the quilt that Toni makes from these charity blocks! If you make any blocks based on this or any of our tutorials, we’d love to see them! Please add them to the Craft Buds Flickr group or share a link in the comments.

Have you tried foundation piecing or another type of paper piecing before? What’s your favorite method (or tools and tricks) of paper piecing?

Noel Paper-Pieced Quilt Block

 

12 Days of Christmas Sampler Quilt Along

Welcome to visitors from the 12 Days of Christmas Sampler Quilt Along. For those of you who don’t know, Craft Buds is one of 12 stops on a fun blog hop where you can quilt along with others to make a modern Christmas quilt using a variety of techniques like applique, foundation piecing and paper piecing.

I’ll show you the latter of these today, and we’ll learn how to make this paper-pieced Noel quilt block. Let’s get started!

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First, you’ll want to print off the free Noel quilt block template I’ve created. Save a copy to your computer and then print out, so it will print to scale. You might want to print two copies: one to cut up, and one to use as a visual reference. You can even color in the letters of the reference copy with your fabric choices.

Next, gather your fabrics. I’ve chosen two prints and one solid, and you can get away with a fat quarter or less of each. (Note: If you are using a 10-inch layer cake, you’ll want to adjust the measurements on the border, because my pattern uses some 11-inch strips. Use your imagination, and your block will turn out great! You will want to make sure you have at least a quarter yard of the background fabric.)

Other Supplies:

  • freezer paper (from the grocery store)
  • pen or pencil
  • glue stick or double-sided tape
  • clear ruler
  • paper scissors
  • fabric scissors or rotary cutter

Start by cutting out the sections of the N-O-E-L letters with your paper scissors (so you don’t dull the blades of your fabric shears). From the paper, you’ll only need to cut out one of each letter, A through I. Set the rest of the paper template aside for reference.

Note: We will not be flipping any of the shapes backwards, so just make sure that your paper templates and the fabric pieces all face the right way when you look at them. How easy is that?! Please ignore the fact that my Noel template is reversed in the first image below. Yours will look normal, spelling Noel from left to right.

Next, tear off a sheet of freezer paper, and put the shiny side down. Use  a very small dot of glue from your glue stick to adhere your paper templates A through I to the dull side of the freezer paper. (I say a small dot because you’ll be ironing with this paper later.) Space them out so you’ll have plenty of room for tracing around each piece. If you don’t have freezer paper, you can still carefully trim your pieces using regular paper templates.

Cut and Trace Templates

Use your clear ruler and pen or pencil to trace a line a quarter inch from each side of your templates. My friend Jennifer likes to use the Add a Quarter ruler for this step. Once you’ve traced each piece, use your paper scissors to cut along the lines you’ve just drawn.

Starting with the letter “N”, take your freezer paper templates for the center section (G, H and I) and iron the shiny surface to the front/patterned side of your fabric. (At this point, you’ll wish you used as little glue as possible. I left the paper on my freezer paper while ironing, and it was fine.) The templates will adhere to your fabric and can be used several times before they lose their stickiness.

Make the Letter N

Cut around each template with your fabric shears. Remove the freezer paper for the fabric pieces you are getting ready to sew, joining G, H, and I. Press your seams open.

Next, you’ll stitch on the left and right sides of the letter “N” (cut from pattern piece A) to the section you just made. From your background fabric, cut out pattern piece B and stitch to the right side of your letter “N” (this is the thin, green strip you see below).

"N" and "O"

Use the same method for creating the letter “O”, always starting with the most complex part of the letter and working outward. Join the letter “O” to your “N” and following the template for letters “E” and “L” to finish the word.

Noel Paper Pieced Block

Press your block, making sure you’ve ironed all the seams open. Trim the top and bottom of your block so all edges are even. Your block will now measure about 4.75 inches x 11 inches. Next, you’ll cut two 3-inch x 11-inch strips from your background fabric and stitch borders to both the top and bottom edges of your “Noel.”

Top and Bottom borders

Cut a 2.5-inch x 11-inch strip from each of your other fabrics (I used the pink and white, as in my letters). Stack one patterned strip on top of the other, and use your ruler to cut a diagonal line down the center of both pieces, as shown.

Cut top and bottom borders

Pair each of your new strips with the opposite color piece that fits and stitch together, pressing open your seams. Add your new “wonky stripes” to both the top and bottom of your block for a fun border.

Trim the top and bottom of your block so it is 12.5 inches tall. Finally, add a 1.5-inch strip of background fabric to each side to widen your block, and trim to 12.5 inches square.

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Not in the market for a Christmas quilt? I this block would look fabulous as a holiday pillow, stocking or hot pad.

If you make this block, you are welcome to add it to the Flickr group for the quilt-along and the Craft Buds Flickr pool. In fact, look at this awesome and modern Christmas quilt by in the making by Marcia, created with the block tutorials posted so far. I’m in love with her color choices!

Get all the tutorials at Sew Sweetness. Also, there’s still time to enter the fabric giveaway from Modern Fabric Studio!

Fresh Picks for Thursday, 8.4.11

Sometimes, life doesn’t go as planned. Like yesterday, when our server went down for about 8 hours. Though the Craft Buds site was inaccessible, we’re back up now and planning to change servers to make sure we can continue to give you the best Craft Buds ever!

Please bear with us over the next day or so if you get an error message when logging into the site. We’re aware that there may be a slight delay in switching servers, and we’ll do our best to continue everything as planned, including our . . .

Giveaways! You can still enter the Margot Potter book giveaway (through Friday night) and the Slice Fabrique giveaway (through Tuesday night). We may adjust those end dates if we experience more delays with our site, so please bookmark these links and check back if you get an error message.

Here are this week’s Fresh Picks!

Fruit Mini Cards

Fruit Salad: Learn how to make these fruity mini cards at Little Lovelies! Allison explains paper piecing with stamps and colorful paper to make little gift tags that really pop.

Fabric Pom Pom tutorial

Shake Your Pom Poms: It’s a bright twist on the traditional pom-pom trim. Learn how to make your own fabric pom poms from this colorful tutorial at Maureen Cracknell Handmade.

Baby Girl Sandals from Leather

Leather Be: Can you believe these baby girl sandals are handmade from faux leather? Get the tutorial at Make it and Love it.

Redecorating a Room

Before and After: If you’ve ever attempted to redecorate a room from start to finish, you’ll appreciate this family room re-do at I Am Momma Hear Me Roar! It has lots of cute decorating ideas, like this jar filled with whimsy.

Adoption auction fundraiser Adoption Auction jewelry

For a Cause: Go shopping for a cause at the Gotta Have Faith Fundraiser Auction, to support adoption. Online bidding for handmade items starts Thursday at noon and ends Monday! Thanks to Kristy at Hopeful Threads for sharing.

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