Tag Archive for publish craft book

Craft Book Proposal: How to Get an Editor’s Attention

Allison Korleski Please say hello to Allison Korleski, Acquisitions Editor for Interweave Books! Allison is here with some very helpful information for aspiring craft book authors about how the process works. We are so excited to have her insight today as part of Craft Book Month at Craft Buds.

Welcome Allison! Can you tell us a little bit about your job as an acquisitions editor?

I started a little over a year ago. Before that I had been a buyer for a book store for many years, including craft and DIY books. I knew Interweave, and found what they were doing in terms of direct marketing and on-line and eMedia development to be really forward-thinking. (Speaking of which…we just started a new site called FlockShop.com, which offers limited-time deals on a variety of craft products—one item at a time.)

I work out of my apartment in NJ. On top of learning a new job, just getting used to working alone at home was a BIG adjustment. Setting up my home office definitely gave me a new-found appreciation of the IT department. I go visit Interweave’s main offices several times a year—usually for a week or 2 at a time. While there are things I love about working at home, I miss the camaraderie and osmosis of ideas one gets in an office environment, so this lets me have a good balance. The book department has around 14 people in it—that’s editorial, sales, production, and art. I wish I could effectively summarize what an amazing bunch of people they are. Finally, one of our book editors lives in NYC, so we try to get together at least once a month. Our goal is to establish an informal “Interweave East”!

Interweave Books What does your day-to-day work look like?

Day-to-day can vary. I’m generally juggling many proposals at any one time, all in various stages of development. I work with the authors, help focus and develop their ideas, create an outline for the book to give it shape, discuss the types of projects to be included, materials used, and skill levels to be covered. I also spend a lot of time researching designers, trying to get a feel for their style and approach, and an understanding of what sets them apart and makes them special. I troll blogs and websites, look at what is coming out from other publishers, look at trade and craft shows to see what people are teaching, and what trends are evolving. I travel to several shows a year—Quilt Market, TNNA, Beadfest, Tucson bead show, assorted fiber and knitting shows. I also attend the Frankfurt Book Fair in Germany; Interweave works with several publishers in the UK, Europe, and Japan. I also spend a lot of time looking at magazines and craft books, and talk to people at my local yarn and bead stores to see what they are interested in. The research never stops. The one downside is that I wish I had more time for my own knitting!

Weekend Hats book

I’m more or less the gateway to publishing with Interweave, and I take that very seriously. I have a dual responsibility: to be the “face” of interweave, represent my company, find wonderful talent, and make sure that we continue to produce great books for our audience. At the same time, I also have to be an advocate for the authors I work with—to clearly represent their ideas and vision for their book, and make sure that gets translated into the final product. I really believe in every author and project I bring to our editorial group—there’s usually some sort of mind-meld that goes on—so I advocate for them as strongly as possible. All books need to get approved by our editorial group, which is made up of editors, sales and marketing, the editorial directors of our magazines, and others. I have to make a case for each and every book I present; I’m in the hot-seat every meeting, so I need to work with each author to make their presentation rock-solid from the beginning.

I spend much of my time talking with authors, going over what they’ve sent me, discussing projects, evaluating strengths and weaknesses, and discussing the next step. Sometimes we have a breakthrough and decide to change direction completely! At the same time I’m working with our art and production departments, assessing costs for each book, and keeping the author’s vision in mind while I assess what her book will need. I also handle all contract negotiations once we approve any book idea.

Crafters Guide to Taking Great Photos

When considering a new craft book proposal or query, what catches your eye?

Originality, technical skill, and doing their homework. New, innovative ideas or beautiful work will always catch my eye, but a well-crafted proposal will keep my attention. Most publishers post proposal guidelines on their websites, and potential authors should really check those first. Look at what other books a publisher has done, and make sure that your general topic fits with their publishing program. If you are a quilter, you don’t want to approach a publisher who specializes in jewelry. Interweave doesn’t publish books on paper craft, so a card-making proposal isn’t right for us, though it could be perfect for someone else. And even if your children’s picture book has knitting in it, understand that craft publishers may be reluctant to take on such a project.

Understand what you need to do: If you have an book idea but are not sure where to start, a query letter is fine. This is simply a brief email asking if we have any interest in x, along with a sentence or 2 about your background. If you want to do a book on lace knitting, but it happens that we are already working on two or three, it can save you much time and effort to know our interest up front.

Fresh Quilting book

When it comes to sending a formal proposal, we don’t want a complete manuscript, but we do need an outline and summary of your ideas, accompanying images of projects, and a brief writing sample to get a sense of your voice. This doesn’t have to be intimidating—a few paragraphs explaining your book and why you want to write is generally fine. Take the time to research competing books, and be able to articulate how yours is different. Be as specific as possible: a vague proposal of “15 cute knitting projects” with no further details won’t get very far. SEND IMAGES, but please do not send actual projects unless the publisher asks for them. Not everyone works in a company office, and it’s far too easy for projects to get lost or misdirected. Let us know about yourself: your experience, any classes you teach, designs you publish, blogs or websites. And email is by far the best way to send in your proposal!

Be courteous and professional. If you think current books on a topic are lacking information or don’t cover something yours does, that’s a perfectly fair argument you can make. Simply saying other books are boring or ugly is not. Your presentation speaks as much about you as your proposal does. Proof-read for spelling errors, and make sure you are clearly stating your ideas. And I have to be honest, a proposal that begins with “Hiya!” or “Hey, craft lady’” doesn’t strike the best opening note.

Show us your best: when I look at images of your work, I’m looking at both aesthetics and technique. Your projects may be adorable or beautiful, but sloppy or poorly finished work rings an alarm bell. Make sure seams are straight, edges finished, wirework smooth, loose ends woven in, and everything is as polished as you can make it. This is your baby—you want to show it to its best advantage.

A proposal is like an audition, and the author should put as much effort into it as they would into their work.

Spin Art book

After a book proposal has been accepted, what is the typical timeline for publishing a craft book (including writing deadlines, photo shoots, publicity, printing, etc.)?

It can vary. I typically assume the author will need 6 months to a year to complete the manuscript and projects, depending on what she has going on in her life, and make sure to discuss that with her. Once we have the manuscript and projects, it takes another year for us to create the book. We photograph everything ourselves, create illustrations and charts, tech-edit, film any accompanying DVDs, etc. Our marketing and publicity departments get into high gear a bit closer to the book’s publication date, and run full-throttle. A typical list of promotional efforts (blogs, interviews, print ads, Facebook, YouTube, and twitter, email campaigns) can run for more than 2 pages!

What books are you most excited to see in stores this fall? Can you tell me a little about how they came to be?

Oh—we have several! (Unfortunately, I was not at Interweave when these were acquired. Next season.) Mathew Gnagy’s Knitting off the Axis comes to mind, as does Connie Chang Chinchio’s Textured Stitches. Personally, I’m a sucker for interesting construction, which Mathew’s book has in spades. Everything is knit sideways or on the diagonal, and he really gets one thinking about the architecture of knitting. As for Connie, I’ve been a fan of hers for years, regularly picking out her projects in books and magazines. She has such a knack for creating knits one wants not only to knit but to wear (and wear and wear) afterward.

Textured Stitches

Jacey Bogg’s Spin Art blows my mind—the yarns she creates are works of art in themselves, and there seems to be a growing appreciates of yarn for yarn’s sake. Along simpler lines, Weekend Hats is a great collection of hats for every knitter—simple to complex, for both men and women, and perfect quick projects for giving and keeping.

Finally, we have The Crafter’s Guide to Taking Great Photos. It’s a non-tech-y guide specifically for the crafter/DIY audience: all those bloggers and people on Etsy who do great work, but need a little help showcasing it to their best ability. It shows how to get slick, professional-looking photos without a studio or professional equipment, and troubleshoots things like making your own lightbox, avoiding camera shake without needing a tripod, and how to highlight project details. It’s divided into sections on specific craft areas (jewelry, fabric, furniture, etc.) to offer advice particular to each.

Are you a crafter yourself? How do you spend your free time when you’re not hard at work publishing craft titles?

I’m quite an enthusiastic knitter, I do basic bead and wirework and have experimented at metalwork. (the resultant pieces were never worn, nor should they have been.) I’m a lousy enough sewist to really appreciate the talent of others, and I learned how to spin last year. Crochet is still on list—I can do some basic stitches, but do not consider myself a true crocheter yet.

I Am Cute Dresses

Giveaway!

Interweave is giving one lucky winner a copy of the new book, I Am Cute Dresses: 25 Simple Designs to Sew by Sato Watanabe. To enter, leave a comment telling us something you’ve learned about book publishing, or a question you have for Allison. We’ll choose a winner on Friday, September 9.

Update: The giveaway is now closed. Congrats to R Carter!

Craft Book Month at Craft Buds

September is Craft Book Month!

It’s back-to-school season, and September is time to hit the books. Craft books, that is! Big, beautiful craft books. Stunning photography. Crisp, glossy pages. Hard covers or soft. We just love craft books, and we know you do, too. All month long, we will celebrate modern craft books by reviewing new releases, interviewing authors and editors who make the magic happen, and crafting projects from the books we spotlight.

What’s in Store?

Weekly craft book giveaways, a month-long linky party for craft book projects (see below), and a chance for you to learn from our experts. If you’ve ever dreamed of writing a craft book, we also have some fantastic tips on how to get your book published!

The Experts

Find out what catches an editor’s eye from Allison Korleski, Acquisitions Editor for Interweave Books. It may be simpler than you think!

Stay true to your vision while working agents and publishers. See how Shelly and Karen from Patterns by Figgy’s did just that with their first book, Sewing for Boys (Wiley Publishing).

Sewing for Boys book

Learn how to pitch a book with Tonia Davenport, Acquisitions Editor for North Light Craft / F+W Media. She’s got some great tips for aspiring craft book authors.

From blog to book deal. How did she do it? Ask Jessica Levitt, author of new release Modern Mix (Stash Books / C&T).

Modern Mix book

Thinking about opening your own patterns shop, and maybe writing a book, too? Meet Kay Whitt, author of the new book Sew Serendipity Bags (North Light).

Linky Party with Giveaways!

In honor of Craft Book Month, we are hosting a linky party all month long to celebrate. From September 1st through 30th, you may link up one of your favorite craft book projects below for a chance to win some fabric, books, patterns and more. The prizes include:

One winner: Doodle Stitching book + Japanese fabric from Craft Buds
One winner:
Autographed CosmoGIRL Cool Room book + Kona Charm Pack from Craft Buds

Doodle Stitching + Japanese fabric Autographed book + Kona charm pack

One winner: Cloth Paper Scissors book (from Interweave), Paper + Craft book and Fiskars decorative-edged scissors from Craft Buds

Paper Crafting Books + Scissors

One winner: Girl’s World book by Jennifer Paganelli, courtesy of Sis Boom.

One winner: The Practical Guide to Patchwork book courtesy of Dewberry Lane.  (Dewberry Lane is also offering free U.S. shipping on all orders placed during September with the code FREESHIP. Check out her books and patterns.)

One winner: $25 shop credit to My Little Sunshine Handmade

My Little Sunshine Handmade BWS tips button

One winner: 2 sewing patterns of your choice from Pattern Patti
One winner:
Three vintage sewing patterns; selections from Goofing Off

Pattern Patti on Etsy

 

Ready to share your craft book project? Here’s what you need to do to participate:  (Please read carefully)

  1. Create a NEW blog post. Share one project you’ve made from a sewing or general craft book and let us know which book it came from. The project doesn’t have to be brand new, never seen before on your blog – just something you’ve whipped up in the past that you love.
  2. One entry per person. Everyone who links up to the party with the Craft Book Month button will be eligible for our sponsored giveaways!
  3. Link back to Craft Book Month in your post.  You can do this with a button, just copy and paste the HTML code into your post. 
  4. Share the direct link to your post in the linky below. Right click on your post URL to copy link address, then paste it in the linky.
  5. Visit some of the other craft book projects and be inspired! If you are on Flickr, you may also add your photos to the Craft Buds group pool; however, you must also link up the URL of your Flickr post to this linky to be eligible for prizes.
  6. Random winners from the linky party will be announced on October 1, 2011. Giveaways open worldwide. Stay tuned for additional craft book giveaways to be held each week in September (winners announced on Fridays) which will be open to both bloggers and non-bloggers.
  7.  

Subscribe to Craft Buds Subscribe to Craft Buds now so you don’t miss any Q&As, projects, or giveaways! We’ll also update this page with links to each interview, so feel free to bookmark or pin it. Pin It

Build Your Brand: Q&A with Margot Potter and Book Giveaway

If you’ve ever wanted to write a craft book, get your handmade work published in magazines, and make money doing what you love, read on!

Margot Potter

I’m excited to share this interview with Margot Potter, a jewelry designer and mixed-media artist who just released her seventh book, New Dimensions in Bead and Wire Jewelry: Unexpected Combinations, Unique Designs (North Light Books).

Also known as The Impatient Crafter™, Margot’s varied experiences in the craft industry as a designer, consultant, teacher, and TV personality make her the perfect person to talk about building a brand for yourself in the crafting industry.

New Dimensions in Bead and Wire Jewelry

Welcome, Margot, and congrats on your newest book. I also see that you’ve contributed to many, many jewelry books. How do you manage to come up with so many new ideas while working with the same medium?

Well to start, I don’t really work in the same medium, I’m what you might call a highly restless creative person. Jewelry making is what I call my ‘gateway craft.’ It’s how I first started as a designer in this industry, but I’ve been creating things long, long before I started making jewelry and continue to do so.

My studio is filled with inks, paints, papers, ephemera and oddities, beads, wires, die cutting machines, clays, tools from every aisle of the craft store and many culled from hardware stores and flea markets, old game pieces and playing cards, rubber stamps, fibers, you name it, I’ve got it! I will make jewelry from almost anything, but it’s not the only trick in my bag. My second and third book included a variety of non-jewelry projects, I’ve contributed to non-jewelry books and I have created non-jewelry focused projects for a wide variety of craft companies including a weekly Teen Craft column for ILovetoCreate last year before taking the full time job at Jewelry Television as their Creative and Education Coordinator.

If you poke around my blog archives, you’ll see lots and lots of non-jewelry projects. All of that being said, I never, ever run out of ideas. I’m endlessly inspired by the world around me and there is a queue of designs in my brain waiting patiently to be explored every moment!

Controlled Chaos Copyright 2011 Margot Potter for Jewel School

Controlled Chaos Copyright 2011 Margot Potter for Jewel School

What jewelry trends or techniques are you loving right now?

I love that there is a real embracing of the idea of mixed media in the mainstream craft world. I’m also loving the potential for that to blur some of the lines between art and craft. It’s really exciting stuff. Personally, I am so busy making content for my new job; there isn’t a lot of time to explore things outside of that. I am itching to study metal smithing and casting, I’d like to have more skills in my bag of tricks. Also hat making, sewing and shoe making. As for trends, I think we’re kind of stuck a little right now, though I am mad for the big black goth pieces Proenza Schouler showed on the runways this Fall and I love the bold metal jewelry trend.

Margot Potter ad As a “professional crafter/artist,” how do you maintain work/life balance?

I have a full time creative job working for someone else now, so I try to leave work at work (though it’s tough since a lot of my work takes place in my home studio). It is not always easy when there are lots of deadlines looming and my daughter really needs my attention. She trumps everything though. Family comes first. Making stuff is what I do, it isn’t all of who I am. I will never stop loving the wonder of exploring creativity. It is powerful stuff indeed.

How do you use social media or personal networking to help promote your books and blogs?

I built my entire brand on the internet. It’s free, it’s easy and it’s powerful. At the moment, I am finding Facebook to be king in terms of reaching the most people in the shortest amount of time and most effectively. It seems as if there are so many blogs with so much content, it’s becoming a lot of white noise. Twitter is so linear, and I feel like most folks that use it treat it like a monologue. I have four Facebook pages, which is at times overwhelming, but it helps to niche things. I think Google+ is on to something.

I don’t have as much time to devote to social networking now that I’m working full time for someone else, so I have to carve out time in the spaces in between. For folks who are building a brand, it is without doubt the best way to do it. The key is to know your audience and to interact with them. It’s all about dialogue on the internet, even though that presents challenges. Transparency is key.

Delicious Denim Necklace Copyright Margot Potter for Jo-Ann Fabrics

Delicious Denim Necklace Copyright Margot Potter for Jo-Ann Fabrics

Do you have any tips for an aspiring professional crafter or craft book author?

Yes, they’re all on my blog. I have written endless posts about how to write and publish a craft book, how to get your work into magazines, how to negotiate contracts, how to do what you love and make money . . . you name it. I have freely shared it in painstaking detail! I figure if people really want to know, they’ll take the time to dig around in my archives and find the information. I get so many emails on a regular basis from folks asking for advice, it was easier to just write it all out and post it.

The biggest thing I want people to know is my three pronged approach to success: Do what you love, do something for which you have a true proclivity and be willing to do the hard work to make it real.

Giveaway!

New Dimensions in Bead and Wire Jewelry

We’re giving away a copy of Margot’s newest book, New Dimensions in Bead and Wire Jewelry: Unexpected Combinations, Unique Designs.

Leave a comment on this post telling me something you learned from this interview. One entry per person. Giveaway open worldwide. We’ll pick one winner via Random.org on Friday, August 5th (11:59pm, EST).

Thank you Margot!

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