Tag Archive for storey publishing

Craft Book Month: The Sewing Rabbit + Sewing Mama RaeAnna

Happy Tuesday! I’m so excited to share two more projects from the Craft Book Month 2013 blog hop . . . have you decided what book you’ll be crafting from for this year’s contest?

First up is Jess of The Sewing Rabbit. When I heard about the new book Skirt-a-Day Sewing by Nicole Smith (Storey), I recommended it to my friend Jess. Not only does she always whip up the cutest outfits, but she is one of the only people I know who is ambitious enough to actually sew a skirt a day! If you are not already familiar with Jess’s blog, be sure to head over and sign up for her newsletter, filled with lots of tutorials, news and giveaways.

 

Hop over to The Sewing Rabbit to see more of Jess’s faves from the book!

 

 

 

When RaeAnna told me she was making a project from the book Sewing for Boys (Wiley), I was super excited. This is a book I’ll definitely need to own someday, with a little boy on the way this winter! The authors Shelly and Karen are also the sweetest gals ever, and I was able to interview them a couple years back for our very first Craft Book Month. RaeAnna didn’t even need to buy any new fabric for this top . . . she upcycled two maternity shirts to get the look!

 

Head over to Sewing Mama RaeAnna to see the Raglan Tee in action!

 

Want to join us and sew along for Craft Book Month 2013?
Also, check out the Craft Book Month Prizes!

Author Talk: “Improv Sewing” + Giveaway!

Today, we are thrilled to have special guests Nicole Blum and Debra Immergut, authors of Improv Sewing: A Freeform Approach to Creative Techniques! Read on for an informative Q&A on what it takes to write a craft book, and leave a comment to win a copy of their book.

Can you tell me how you met and started blogging together?

We met at Family Fun Magazine where Debra is an editor and I am a freelance crafter and stylist. We collaborated on many features and knew we worked well together. Our blog came about after we started writing Improv Sewing – an idea initiated by Debra who likes to tell how she would often see me coming in with boxes of crafts wearing something I had stitched. Debra thought she might not be the only one who would want to learn how to make clothes for themselves so asked if I would like to pitch a sewing book with her. Well, yes ma’am, I did. Improv Diary is our shared space for talking about creativity and making lovely things, as well as a few other random ideas.

With a background in creative publishing, it seems a natural fit that you would work together to write a book. How did you go about the process of pitching the book proposal to a publisher (or did it work the other way around)? Can you describe that process?

Yes, you are right, it was a natural fit. After we agreed that we wanted to pitch a sewing book, I stitched up a dozen or so things, Debra wrote a fantastic introduction and then laid out the photographed projects in such a nice way, it appeared we already had a book completed. After one false start with a publisher in New York we pitched the book to Storey Publishing. They are small but have had some great success in sewing books so we knew they would understand what we were trying to achieve. Furthermore, they are all about creative self-reliance and our concept fit right in with that. We were so fortunate to have a very quick response from them – waiting can be a killer – and they wanted it! They wanted it but wondered if we would be interested in increasing the size and breadth of the book from 30 clothing projects to 101 sewing projects that would span garment making to quick gifts. Despite that large number, we didn’t really hesitate – more projects definitely meant more work, but it also meant more fun.

Once the book deal was official, how did you divvy up the work of writing the book? With 101 projects, this surely took a great deal of time. What do you recall about those days of making the actual book projects?

Divvying up the work was a natural process – something that was obvious as we entered into the project’s first stages. We brainstormed a big list to get started with – obviously my clothing designs and other fun things I had designed over the years – and then we went to our respective corners for a while. I went to my studio where I designed, developed, stitched, and photographed and Debra started writing the core message of the book and introductions to the individual projects. As I finished developing things, I would send notes and images to Debra so she could write the instructions. In the early days, Debra was just learning to sew, which was perfect. I had to be thoughtful about the steps and process and if I was unclear or something didn’t make sense, she would catch it right away and ask all the right clarifying questions. Sometimes I had to re-develop something and sometimes I just need to explain the steps more clearly. As our deadline creeped closer, we began to meet more regularly to go over the directions, sew together, and draw up rough art to give to our illustrator. Those days feel like a while ago and I mostly remember sewing for very long stretches of time. I can safely say that Debra most likely remembers many late nights writing. Of course we wanted to projects to stand out and inspire people, but we also wanted the book to be a good read – I think we were successful.

Fast forward to the day you received a copy of the finished book in your hands. Can you describe your reaction, and any reflections on the process?

I will never forget the day that the guy delivered my ONE copy of the book (we’d have to wait a whole month before we’d see any more). It was wrapped in brown paper with a lovely piece of natural paper twine and a very kind note from our fantastic editor. My family gathered around and we looked at it and I had so many emotions and thoughts I couldn’t pin any one down. It had taken so much work and time to get to that place and then the book was in my hand – and it looked so beautiful to me!

What’s next for you both?

We have some ideas for another book that we have been tossing around, but for now, we have a lot of work to do to get the word out about this book and think we should dedicate our free time to doing just that.

Improv Sewing book cover

Free Projects

Storey Publishing was gracious to share two free projects from the book, including the:

Reverse applique t-shirt

Reverse applique ottoman cover

 

Giveaway!

Storey is giving away a copy of Improv Sewing to one lucky Craft Buds reader. To enter to win, just leave a comment on this post about something you’ve learned from this Q&A. Giveaway limited to North America. We’ll choose one random winner a week from today’s post!

Congrats to commenter #30, Samantha!

Craft Book Author Emily Neuburger + Giveaway!

Today we are excited to have special guest Emily Neuburger, author of the book Show Me a Story: 40 Craft Projects and Activities to Spark Children’s Storytelling. Emily is joining us to talk about her kids craft book as well as the writing process for her book. At the end of this post, you can also enter to win a copy of her book!

Emily Neuburger

Welcome to Craft Book Month, Emily! Can you tell me what you love about telling stories, and why it’s important?
I love making crafts that facilitate storytelling because it offers children (and adults) the chance to drift into imaginary worlds where anything is possible. I have always been a daydreamer – where twigs and dirt often became mountains and trees – and I am a firm believer in nurturing children’s natural inclination to spend time with their imaginations.  Storytelling is so healthy and good for children – it helps them practice communicating, it expands their emotional awareness, and it is often a way for them to experiment with problem solving.  And, um, it is also super fun!

This is a very unique book concept. How did you go about conveying your concept to a publisher and what did you learn?
I actually submitted a book proposal where storytelling crafts was only one of the chapters in the proposed book. The editor who I was working with suggested that I elaborate on just the storytelling chapter since it was so unique and vibrant.  The process of uncovering the heart and soul of my book served as a reminder to be willing to experiment with shifting the focus of a project.

Creative storytelling crafts - Red Bird Crafts

When it came time to write the book, what did your timeline look like, and how did you interact with the publisher?

The process was definitely lengthy with lots of different, distinct steps along the way. After signing on with Storey Publishing, I was given six months to write my manuscript. I checked in with my editor from time to time, but I mostly just curled up in my cozy chair and wrote. Once the manuscript was turned in, I shifted my focus to craft styling – and more craft styling and more craft styling. Then, there was the photo shoot, copy edits, proof edits, more proof edits, and then four months to wait before I saw my first printed and bound copy. The time frame from the time I wrote my proposal to the release date was approximately 3 years. I found the whole process rewarding and interesting.

And, now, I am excitedly preparing for my book tour! Hooray! In the coming months, I’ll be visiting book shops, craft spaces, and museums to share projects from the book.  I’m really looking forward to connecting with children and adults as they create; it will be fun and beautiful, and I can’t wait.

Scenes from Tell Me a Story

How would you compare the process of blogging about crafts on your blog Red Bird Crafts and actually compiling a book?
Honestly, writing blog posts and book chapters feels extremely satisfying and exciting for me! In the end, the two writing processes felt very similar because I approach my writing as an educator and an artist. I love to inspire people to be creative and to encourage them to have confidence in their art; both forms of writing offer me the chance to do just that.

Thanks for your insights into the book writing process! What’s next for you, Emily?
Thanks for asking! I have lots of exciting new projects and ideas coming together right now.  I’ll still be blogging at Red Bird Crafts, but in a few weeks I’ll also have a new website at EmilyNeuburger.com. The new site will showcase more of what I offer as a teacher – library and school visits, curriculum guides, and my local classes.  I’m very excited for launch day!

Show Me a Story book

Giveaway!

Storey Publishing is giving one lucky Craft Buds reader a copy of Emily’s new book, Show Me a Story. To enter the giveaway, just leave a comment on this post telling us something you learned from our Q&A with Emily. One random winner will be chosen in a week. Entries limited to North America.

Have you been hopping with us this week?

Sunday 9/9: Sweet Diesel Designsmissknitta’s studio
Monday 9/10: Sew TaraClover and Violet
Tuesday 9/11: Sew Fantasticamylouwho

Craft Book Month Prizes

Show us your craft book project from Sept 23-30 and win prizes!

Review: Improv Sewing + Giveaway

Improv Sewing book cover

Improv Sewing: A Freeform Approach to Creative Techniques is a new book from Storey Publishing filled with “101 fast, fun and fearless projects” to sew and love. The sheer number of projects is enough to get excited over, but the variety of techniques (from upcycling to reverse applique) is a huge bonus.

Improv Sewing book table of contents

Authors Nicole Blum and Debra Immergut show off 101 sewing projects in the same style of those on their blog that are suited for beginners and intermediate sewists. The freestyle approach to sewing includes appliqued and stitched motifs, based on simple designs, several of which require no pattern pieces. Many also feature recycled and upcycled materials. Projects in the book include embellished dresses, tunics, scarves, skirts, accessories, pillows, curtains and more.

Improv Sewing ruffled dress

The “Ruffled Dressy Dress” is a cute and comfy dress pattern embellished with texture, but there are several variations on this concept, including a simple two-piece shift dress. With clothing for women, men and kids, the book offers a diverse variety of patterns.

Improv Sewing rainbow mobile

Feeling the need for some home decor? The “All-Weather Applique Mobile” pairs bright fabrics with whimsical shapes and machine embroidery, for a darling project that would suit a nursery or creative space.

Improv Sewing fused plastic wallet

The authors of Improv Sewing have a definite bent toward upcycling, and many of their projects show how to use free or inexpensive materials in a new way. This “Fused Plastic Wallet” has decorative stitching and is sized perfectly to slip your cash and a few credit cards inside.

Improv Sewing Reverse Applique Tee

This men’s reverse-applique tee is simple and stylish, with an organic design embellished on the lower front of the shirt. Kids and beginning sewists can learn this technique of reverse applique and hand-stitching to make clothing, accessories and home decor.

Free Projects

Storey Publishing was gracious to share two free projects from the book, including the:

Reverse applique t-shirt

Reverse applique ottoman cover

Giveaway!

Would you like to win a copy of Improv Sewing? Just leave a comment on this post to be entered to win. We’ll choose one random winner on Wednesday, July 4, 2012. Check out the rest of the Improv Sewing blog tour at:

June 29: http://unanimouscraft.com/
July 10: http://www.craftfoxes.com/

Congrats to our giveaway winner, commenter #52 Fenna, who said: “Cool book! I like upcycling stuff–it’s a great way to re-use!”

Book Review + Giveaway: Sew What! Bags

Sew What! Bags cover

Sew What! Bags: 18 Pattern-Free Projects You Can Customize to Fit Your Needs is an older release from Storey Publishing. In the book, author Lexie Barnes teaches how to make a variety of bags, totes, and containers. Because the projects only require straight-line sewing and don’t require patterns, her technique is ideal for newbie sewists.

Sew What Bags chapter

The book is broken down into sewing basics including tools, understanding fabric, and getting to know your sewing machine. Color illustrations teach the reader how to sew straps, simple linings, and pockets.

Sew What Tote Bags

In the Warm-up Projects chapter, Barnes teaches readers to sew some of life’s simplest “bags,” like an eyeglass case, tissue pouch, and grocery bag tube. Her technique allows readers to measure their own belongings and create a custom-size bag to fit.

She also explains how the many projects are related to each other. For instance, once you’ve learned to sew the eyeglass case, you’ve essentially learned how to sew the five projects below: a diaper case, knitting wristlet, sandwich bag, business card case, and lip balm lanyard. Since all the projects use the same basic construction, they can be customized with an extra strap, drawstring, or flap to serve different purposes. Barnes empowers sewing through teaching basic techniques, so they aren’t limited to sewing with patterns already written.

Sew What Simple Bags

Beyond the beginner projects, this book covers totes, drawstring sacks, and messenger bags. Within each section are illustrated steps for several styles of bags in set sizes. But the reader is not limited to one style, because each project details how you can customize the bag with zippers, flaps, velcro, pockets, or a new size to fit your needs!

Sew What Messenger Bags

The final chapter dives into organizers like a tool apron or wall caddy, with neat-and-tidy pockets for kitchenware or even art supplies. Though advanced projects may initially scare away beginners, the book offers a progression of skills for the modern sewist. By the end, you, too could be customizing your bags and maybe even writing some patterns of your own.

I adore this book, from the variety of projects to the modern fabrics featured. I also love the streamlined look of the 18 projects. Without all the frills and fuss, it’s easy to learn the very basic of bag making from this book, and grow in your confidence as a sewist.

Giveaway!

Giveaway now closed. Congrats to #138, Julie!

Would you like to win a copy this book?

  1. Enter to win by leaving a comment on this post about your favorite type of bag.
  2. For an extra entry, “Like” Storey Publishing on Facebook and leave a second comment.

Giveaway open to U.S. residents only. Good luck! Giveaway ends Monday, Feb. 6.

Author Q&A: One-Yard Wonders + Giveaway

One Yard Wonders authors Rebecca Yaker and Trish Hoskins

Today at Craft Buds, we are thrilled to feature Trish Hoskins (left) and Rebecca Yaker (right), authors of the new book, Fabric by Fabric: One Yard Wonders (Storey). This book is the follow-up to the very popular One-Yard Wonders: 101 Sewing Projects. Like the original, it also includes 101 sewing projects and full-size patterns for projects you can make with one yard of fabric.

The fun twist to this new book is a focus on different types of fabrics, with chapters broken up into lightweight and quilting weight cottons, home dec fabrics, flannel, fleece, woven pile fabrics, wool, coated fabrics (oilcloth and laminates), and knits.

Fabric by Fabric One Yard Wonders book cover

This book includes designs submitted by multiple contributors, and features new sewing patterns from designers you already know and love, like:

Lindsay of Craft Buds has a plush manatee featured in the book, and we’ll feature some of projects from the book throughout this Q&A.

Hugh Manatee

Trish and Rebecca, congratulations on the release of your newest book. Can you tell me a little bit about the process of creating this follow-up to the original OYW? When did you start planning it, and what parts of the process were your favorites?

Trish: Let’s see… if memory serves, we started working on Fabric by Fabric very shortly after the first One-Yard Wonders book was released. Like, the following February or March (2010). I really enjoy seeing all the submissions (proposed projects) when they come in – lots of WOW factor! I feel honored to see so much creativity at work. I also really do love the editing process – and figuring out how to make everything read as “one voice.”

Rebecca: Thank you Lindsay – we are so very excited to have and hold the final, hardcover, spiral bound Fabric-by-Fabric book in our hands! As Trish mentioned, we sent out our call for submissions in February 2010, and the final manuscript was due to Storey Publishing October 1 of that same year. We received so many original, inspirational projects from around the world, our heads were spinning! Sorting through all the projects, we formulated the areas of emphasis for the book and the specific chapters. From there we began the editing process, which was no small feat. We couldn’t be happier with the finished product! Honestly the entire process is challenging and very rewarding. For me, I love the opportunity to (virtually) meet so many other crafters. Getting to know them through their projects and blogs is an inspiration. There are some people that I have developed lasting friendships with because of these books.

Fabric by Fabric One Yard Wonders 3

What are the most challenging and the most rewarding parts about writing a book with multiple contributors?

Trish: One of the most challenging elements is that everyone has such a different way of writing & explaining their process. Sometimes it can be hard to understand what is going on, and this may simply be due to a difference in how my mind works compared to the contributor’s. Or it’s simply a type of project I’ve never made before. Also, if you realize that we usually don’t actually make the projects ourselves (unless we *really* don’t understand the project, or a certain step; then I will make a sample to make sure I know what’s going on), it can be challenging to mentally walk through all the steps to make sure we don’t miss anything, and that we can translate it all for the reader. As for the rewarding parts – as I mention above,one big thing is seeing the diverse range of project ideas. It continually blows me away what people can think of to make with one yard of fabric. I also love the “community” that each book creates among its contributors.

Rebecca: When I think back to working on the first One-Yard Wonders book, I think the original challenge was how to tackle the project and solicit 101 unique, compelling, original sewing ideas. It quickly became apparent that there are amazing, original sewers out there and no shortage of ideas! Once we established how to reach out to other sewers through blogs, etsy, facebook, craft forums, etc., the word really started to spread, and we quickly realized just how rewarding it was to put together both One-Yard Wonders and Fabric-by-Fabric. We can’t say thank you enough to all the contributors for their remarkably unique projects in these books. Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!!! It has been a pleasure working with each and every one of you!

Fabric by Fabric One Yard Wonders 4

Which projects did you each contribute to the book, and do you have a favorite?

Trish: I contributed the Coupon Wallet, the Day of the Week Planner, and the Lap Desk. I *may* or may not have “facilitated” the projects from my husband Matt (bicycle panniers) and my then-one-year-old son Archer (Space Beans Target Toss). If you’re talking about favorites among my own projects, I particularly love the Coupon Wallet because I had to solve a variety of challenges in its construction to meet my vision (and I achieved it!), AND it’s supremely practical and functional. My own coupon wallet goes with me everywhere! But frankly I am proud of all of them. I’d like to give a special shout out to my family’s projects, though, because er, they had a HELL of a time figuring out how to get everything needed for each project out of just one yard; thank goodness they eventually succeeded – whew! If you are wondering which of all 101 projects might be my favorite, hm…. I plead the fifth!

Rebecca: I contributed three original projects to Fabric-by-Fabric: The Boxer Shorts (page 180); the Cap Sleeve Bolero (page 28); and the Party Lamp Shade (page 42). I enjoy all three projects for different reasons. I originally made the lampshade for our home because we were unable to find a fun and unique lampshade at an affordable price in the size and color we needed. Voila! Insta-perfect lampshade, and we have received many compliments. I love that this project is customizable to meet your personal specifications. My husband loves the Boxer Shorts, and my favorite of my two apparel projects is the Bolero. This cute, fitted, tailored top is kind of like an accessory, as it helps you infuse a little bit of pattern in your outfit. I love wearing it over tank tops, and even long sleeve solid t-shirts. Like the description says, it adds a little bit of pizzazz to your outfit.

Fabric by Fabric One Yard Wonders 2

What’s next for both of you?

Trish: We do hope to start working on a 3rd One-Yard Wonders soon – we hope to receive word on that in the very near future (look for our call for submissions!) I do have lots of IDEAS for furthering my professional design / pattern-making / crafting career, but between this fabulous series and Crafty Planet, we’ll have to see what I manage to get done!

Rebecca: Trish and I are both ready to begin another One-Yard Wonder project! Hopefully this will get underway early next year, so please feel free to email us at oneyardwonders @ gmail.com to get on our mailing list and receive notification of our call for submissions. Otherwise, you can also check www.oneyardwondersbook.com for updates. I’m enjoying catching up on some personal projects and gifts for the holidays. In addition to sewing, I enjoy hand knitting and adore machine knitting. I’m currently revamping my studio space, and will soon be sharing it with my husband (a photographer and sculptor). I look forward to inspiring one another and working together on projects in our shared space.

My Project, Hugh Manatee

Giveaway!

Would you like to win a copy of Fabric-by-Fabric: One-Yard Wonders? Enter the giveaway here!

Also, you can follow along with the blog tour at:

12/12/2011 Becka’s Project Journal
12/13/2011 Craft Buds
12/14/2011 Patch Work Duck Designs
12/15/2011 A Spoonful of Sugar
12/15/2011 Nifty Kidstuff
12/15/2011 Becka’s Project Journal
12/16/2011 Nom Nom Nom Nom
12/16/2011 Quaint and Quirky
12/17/2011 ikatbag
12/17/2011 Two Brown Birds
12/18/2011 Sharon Sews
12/19/2011 LBG Studio
12/19/2011 Carolina Fair Designs
12/19/2011 Under Construction
12/20/2011 Little Blue Cottage
12/21/2011 Craftzine
12/21/2011 Neuroses Galore
12/21/2011 Emily Steffen
12/22/2011 Jenna Lou Loves You
12/23/2011 Spincushion
12/27/2011 One Inch World
12/28/2011 Sew Sew Etc.
January ‘12 Lu Lu Carter
January ’12 Fiberosity
January ’12 Zuhause
January ’12 Obsessively Stiching

One Yard Wonders on Facebook | Storey Publising

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