Tag Archive for tote

Mosaic Tiles Messenger Bag Tutorial with Katy of The Littlest Thistle

Hi, I’m Katy from The Littlest Thistle, and I’m really happy to be here today with another Mosaic Tiles block project from Lindsay’s new book, Modern Bee.

I know how hard Lindsay worked to make her book dream become a reality, and I’m delighted that it came together in such a lovely book. For my stop, well, I’m a bag lady at heart, so I’m afraid my project was only ever going to find its way into a bag somehow!  I love how this Mosaic Tiles block isn’t a traditional symmetric block, making it a perfect project to put on a bag for a nice, modern young lady.  It finishes up at 12″ x 12″ x 3″, with an adjustable strap and a simple button closure.

 

To make this bag, you will need:

  • Scraps for coloured squares in the block
  • 1 yd main outer fabric
  • 1 yd lining fabric
  • 1 1/2 yds 35″ wide OR 2 1/2 yds 22″ wide fusible woven interfacing, such as Vilene G700 or Pellon SF-101 Shapeflex
  • 1 1/2 yds thick fusible fleece, such as Vilene H640 or Pellon TP971F Fusible Thermolam
  • 1 large button
  • 1 1 1/2″ strap slider + 2 1 1/2″ rectangular rings to match
  • 1 14″ zip  (please note that mine was longer and had to be cut down)

From this, you will need to cut:

From scraps:
  • 9 x 2 1/2″ squares
From main outer fabric:
  • 2 x 2″ WOF strips, subcut one to get 1 x 1 1/2″ x 11″ strip for side of flap
  • 1 x 1 1/2″ x 11″ strip for side of flap
  • 1 x 1 1/2″ x 13″ strip for bottom of flap
  • 1 x 4 1/2″ x 13″ piece for top of flap
  • 1 x 13″ x 16″ for flap lining – O1
  • 1 x 13″ x 13″ for back – O2
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – O3
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – O4
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – O5
  • 1 x 6″ x WOF for strap – O6
  • 2 x 3″ x 6″ for strap ends – O7
From lining fabric:
  • 3 x 13″ x 13″ for back/front/back of front pocket – L1
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – L2
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – L3
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – L4
  • 1 x 7″ x 13″ for lining patch pocket – L5
From fusible woven interfacing:
  • 2 x 13″ x 16″ for flap – W1
  • 2 x 13″ x 13″ for back/back of front pocket – W2
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – W3
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – W4
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – W5
  • 1 x 6″ x WOF for strap – W6
  • 2 x 3″ x 6″ for strap ends – W7
From fusible fleece:
  • 1 x 12″ x 15″ for flap – F1
  • 2 x 12″ x 12″ for back/back of front pocket – F2
  • 1 x 9 3/4″ x 12″ for bottom of front zip pocket – F3
  • 1 x 2″ x 12″ for top of front zip pocket – F4
  • 3 x 3″ x 12″ for base and sides – F5

 

Preparing the pieces:

Fuse the fusible woven interfacing onto the back of the fabric pieces according to the manufacturer’s instructions:

  • 1 x W1 -> O1
  • 1 x W2 -> O2
  • 1 x W2 -> 1 x L1
  • W3 -> O3
  • W4 -> O4
  • 3 x W5 -> 3 x O5
  • W6 -> O6
  • 2 x W7 -> 2 x O7
Centre the following on the back of each fabric/woven interfacing piece, leaving a 1/2″ seam allowance all the way round, then fuse according to the manufacturer’s instructions:
  • 1 x F2 -> O2
  • 1 x F2 -> L1
  • F3 -> O3
  • F4 -> O4
  • 3 x F5 -> 3 x O5

Making the bag:

Please note that there is a 1/2″ seam allowance (SA) unless otherwise stated.  Remember to back stitch at either end!

1. Using the 2″ strips of the outer fabric, and the 2 1/2″ squares, assemble the block as per the instructions in the book with a 1/4″ SA:

2. Add the two 1 1/2″ x 11″ strips to either side of the block, then the 1 1/2″ x 13″ strip at the bottom, and the 4 1/2″ x 13″ piece at the top all using a 1/4″ SA.  Press your seams really well, then fuse the remaining W1 piece to the back, followed by the F1 piece.

3. Take your zip and work out where the tape meets the side of piece O3.  Make a small mark, then make a few stitches at that point to keep the tape together when assembling the pocket – make sure the zipper is on the correct side of the stitches!

 

4. Turn your zip face down on top of piece O3, making sure the teeth are 1/2″ from the edge of the fabric, then tack in place close to the edge of the tape:

5. Place lining piece L2 face down on top of piece O3, right sides together (RST) sandwiching the zip in between, and stitch in place:

6. Flip both pieces of fabric away from the zip, so that they are wrong sides together (WST) and top stitch along the edge of the fabric near the zip teeth.

7. Take the zip, and place face down on top of piece O4,  making sure the teeth are 1/2″ from the edge of the fabric, then tack in place close to the edge of the tape:

Zip facing down
Zip facing up

8.  Place lining piece L3 face down on top of piece O4, RST, sandwiching the zip in between, and stitch in place:

9. Flip both pieces of fabric away from the zip, so that they are WST and top stitch along the edge of the fabric near the zip teeth.

10. Place pocket on top of piece L1 which has had the fusible interfacing/fleece applied so that the lining pieces are RST, then tack all the way round about 1/4″ from the edge. Trim any excess zipper tape at this point.

11. Take one piece O5, and placing it so that the short edges are top and bottom, draw a line 1/2″ up from the bottom right hand corner between the fusible fleece and the edge:

12. Place marked piece O5 RST on top of the front pocket piece at the right hand side and sew from the very top down to the marked line and stop there.

13. Repeat with piece O2 and another piece O5, marked in the same way as in step 11.  Note that it will also be on the right hand side.

14. Place the pieces from steps 12 and 13 and place them RST.  Mark the bottom right hand corners of pieces O2 and the outer pockets as per step 11, and stitch together at both sides down to the marked line.  You should now have a tube shaped piece.

15. Take the remaining piece O5 and make a mark 1/2″ in from each side at each corner:

 

16. Taking the remaining piece O5, place RST with the pocket side of the tube, matching the long edges.  Note that you will need to pin the sides out of the way.  Going only between the corner marks, stitch together.

17. Work your way round, doing one short side next, then the back, then the remaining short side, ensuring that you only sew between the marks each time.

18. Trim the excess fabric away from each side at each bottom corner:

 

Note that I approach the corner at a shallow angle, to ensure no overlap when the bag is right sides out

19. Turn the bag right sides out:

20. Take one piece O7 and fold in half, matching short edges, and press.  Then fold the short edges into the centre and press.  Repeat with the remaining piece O7.

21. Stitch all the way around each piece 1/8″ from the edge, starting at one short edge, then coming down the open edge before going across the bottom and up the folded edge.

22. Fold piece O6 as per step 20, except matching the long edges together.  Fold each end in by 1/2″ and press.

23. Stitch all the way around as per step 21.

22. Draw a line 1/2″ in from the top stitching at one end of the strap, then join the opposite corners with diagonal lines.  Loop that end of the strap over the cross bar of the slider by 1 1/2″ so that the marked lines are facing upwards.  Following the top stitching already there, stitch round he rectangle twice, using the drawn line as the 4th side, then sew up one diagonal line, across the top and down the other diagonal, and repeat:

23. Take one piece O7 and thread through one rectangle ring, matching short edges.  Centre on the side of the bag, and stitch in place 1/4″ from the edge, going back and forth along the line 3 or 4 times for security.

24. Repeat with remaining piece O7 and rectangular ring, then set bag aside.

25. Place the block flap piece RST with piece O1 and all the way around, leaving the top edge  completely open.  Trim the corners as per step 18, then turn right side out:

26. Press and top stitch round the 3 stitched sides 1/8″ from the edge, then tack the top edge closed 1/4″ from the edge

27.  Make a mark in the centre of the flap 3/4″ from the bottom

28.  Using the buttonhole stitch on your machine, make a buttonhole big enough for your chosen button

29. Place the flap RST with the back of the bag, matching raw edges and tack in place 1/4″ from the edge.

 

30. Take piece L5 and fold in half RST, matching short edges, and sew all round open edges, leaving a 2″ gap for turning.  Trim the corners as per step 18 and turn through the gap.  Push out the corners and press.

31.  Place pocket on top of one piece L1, centred and 4″ down from the top, with the folded edge uppermost, then top stitch along the sides and bottom of the pocket 1/8″ from the edge.

32.  Assemble the bag lining in the same was as the outer from steps 11 to 18, making sure that on one long side of the base you leave a gap 7″ long for turning.

33.  Place the outer bag inside the lining bag and pin in place carefully all the way round, making sure the edges match.

34. Stitch all the way round, then turn the bag through the opening in the base of the lining.  Press in place, then top stitch 1/8″ from the edge all the way round the top of the bag:

35. Thread the strap through one rectangle ring, back through the slider, and finally through the remaining ring with a 1 1/2″ foldover.  Stitch in place as per step 22.

36. Ladder stitch or slip stitch the opening in the lining closed.

37. Sew your button onto the front of the front pocket of the bag, then stand back and admire your bag:

 

 

Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along This post is part of the Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along, which you can read about here! You can enter your project any time between now and February 14, 2014 for a chance to win some great prizes. We hope you’ll join us in this beginner-friendly and stress-free quilt along.

Easy Drawstring Tote

I made this tote to match the number bean bags from this post. They’re just so cute together I can’t resist posting a photo here of the whole set!

I wanted to do a separate post for the tote since it’s such a versatile thing to make and it was really fast to whip up. Plus it’s easy enough you could even make them to use as gift bags! You can find printable instruction sheets for the beanbags and tote for free (with a free Craftsy account) here.

 

To make your own, first cut two rectangles, one for the front and one for the back. You’ll be folding this in half later so take that into account when you decide on a size. For the bean bag tote I used a 23″ x 13″ rectangle. Put right sides together and stitch all the way around but leave a 3″ opening.

 

Turn right side out. Next, use an iron to crease the edges of the opening so that the raw edges are inside. Then fold the top over 1 1/4″ and iron that down. Put a drawstring inside the opening then pin down the edge. Stitch along the edge with a 1/8″ seam allowance.

 

Fold in half so you’re seeing the side that you want to be the inside. Stitch around the bottom and the open side, stopping 2″ before the top.

 

Attach the drawstring toggle.

 

Turn right side out.

 

Ready to fill with goodies!

Tutorial: Totes Big and Small

Make a reusable tote bag in two sizes (free sewing pattern)!

It seems like I’m always leaving the house with something…dinner for a friend, toys for my toddler, extra pair of shoes or who knows what. I usually grab a Bath and Body Works bag or a plastic mega-store bag but in the interest of looking less “mom-frump” (my term for how I often feel these days) I thought a nice set of tote bags would help me look a bit more pulled together. Here’s the first tutorial in the series on some different tote styles. Later I’ll do a second one on a version with a pocket and different handle straps.

You can scale the size up or down for whatever purpose you have in mind. I make two sizes generally. One is a small tote the same size as one of the paper Bath and Body Works bags you get at their stores. It’s great for a few toys, extra shoes, or even wrapping up a gift. The larger size is great for groceries, farmer’s markets, extra toddler clothes/toys when going out for the day, as a beach bag, for a change of clothes for the gym or whatever else you can think of. It’s about the same size as a paper grocery bag.

Online Sewing Class

For this pattern you’ll need an outer fabric and a liner fabric. I like at least one of the fabrics to be a heavier weight to help the bag hold it’s shape a little better. All seam allowances are 1/2″ unless otherwise noted.

1. Small size: Cut 15″ squares from both your outer and liner fabrics with the center fold of the fabric at the bottom of the square. (If you do it this way, you’ll be cutting through two layers of fabric and if you were to open it up, you would have a rectangle of 15″ x 30″.) At each of the bottom corners cut a rectangle 2 1/2″ tall by 3″ wide. If the fabric you’re using doesn’t allow you to have the center fold at the bottom you’ll cut two rectangles from both fabrics 15″ wide by 15 1/2″ tall, and your corners will be 3″ square.
Large size: Cut 20″ squares from both your outer and liner fabrics with the center fold of the fabric at the bottom of the square. (If you do it this way, you’ll be cutting through two layers of fabric and if you were to open it up, you would have a rectangle of 20″ x 40″.) At each of the bottom corners cut a rectangle 3″ tall by 3 1/2″ wide. If the fabric you’re using doesn’t allow you to have the center fold at the bottom you’ll cut two rectangles 20″ wide by 20 1/2″ tall, and your corners will be 3 1/2″ square.

2. For the outer fabric, put right sides together then stitch up the sides. Repeat with the liner fabric.

3. If you have a raw edge rather than a fold at the bottom, stitch that together.

4. Create the bottom of the bag by stitching the corners. See below for photo detail. You’ll stitch all 4 corners (the 2 for the outer fabric and the 2 for the liner).

5. Your outer fabric and liner should now look like this and you can iron the seams flat.

6. Now flip the outer fabric right side out, then nestle the liner inside.

7. Now pin along the bottom of the bag on the front and back, but not the sides. Stitch along the edge with a 1/8″ or 3/16″ seam allowance.

8. Fold the raw edges of the top of your bag in 1/2″ and pin. Also, tuck the straps about 1″ down in between the two fabrics and pin in place. I used cotton webbing from JoAnns, and here’s a comparable strap on Amazon (affiliate link). But you could also make them out of a coordinating fabric. For the small bag each strap is 14″. For the large bag I wanted something I could carry by hand or over my shoulder so it’s 26″.

9. Now stitch around the top. Leave a 1/8″ seam allowance at the top and then sew a second seam 3/4″ down from the top. Then go back and put an X over each strap. Or if you don’t want to have to go back and do the Xs later, see the diagram below for the exact steps I followed.

10. Optional: If you want your tote to have a boxy shape, pin the 4 sides going straight up from each corner then stitch 1/8″ in from the edge like you did in step 9 around the top.

And now your project is complete!

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