Tag Archive for tutorial

No-Sew Fabric Baby Blocks

Fabric Baby Blocks Tutorial at Craft Buds

These large, fabric-covered foam baby blocks are an easy-to-make soft toy for newborns. I made some for my son in less than 20 minutes, and you can, too! Best of all, this no-sew fabric project is something you can put together in between naps or while catching up on your favorite show. Let’s get started!

True Blue fabric by Ana Davis for Blend Fabrics

Materials:

– Quilting Fabric (I used True Blue by Ana Davis for Blend Fabrics)
Foamology (TM) Pull-Apart Design Foam*– Fabric scissors
Optional: glue gun, glue sticks and 1/2″ or wider grosgrain ribbon

Foamology Design Foam

 

1. Pull apart the perforated “blocks” of Design Foam. Each block has one stickybase(tm) surface which adheres to fabric, but not until you peel off the protective backing.

No-Sew Fabric Baby Blocks

2. Cut a piece of fabric 2″ wider on each side than your foam block.

No-Sew Fabric Baby Blocks

3. Peel off the protective sheet and place the block on the fabric, with the sticky facing side up toward you. Wrap the block like a present. With triangular corners, you may have to fudge the corners, but you can make it work. Leave the center sticky area bare.

No-Sew Fabric Baby Blocks

4. With matching fabric, wrap another block of the same shape in the same way. Press the two sticky surfaces together to make one fabric “block.”

5. Optional: If you want to finish off the edges, use a glue gun to adhere grosgrain ribbon around the perimeter to cover up the seams. You can also insert “tags” of ribbon in between the sticky blocks to make a “taggy” block! The possibilities are endless, so have fun and use your imagination.

No-Sew Fabric Baby Blocks

My 5-month-old son loves these blocks because they are easy to grab and soft to touch. Toss a few around your baby’s play mat, and they won’t mind rolling over them… or even taking a bite.

DSC_0576

What is your child’s favorite soft toy?

Non-Slip Sewing Machine Mat Tutorial from sewVery

organizer16

Do you have problems with your sewing machine or serger sliding around on the table while you work? I do! I even broke a water glass the other day because it fell off my sewing table while my work station was bumping all around.

I love this smart solution from my friend Veronica, who blogs at sewVery! It features some pretty Maisie by Maude Asbury fabric from Anna Griffin.

Head over to sewVery to see the non-slip machine mat tutorial!

Patchwork Potholder Tutorial with Sewing Mama RaeAnna

My friend RaeAnna, who I have the pleasure of seeing in real life as well as following her sewing blog, has whipped up a fun tutorial for Craft Buds readers today! It’s a pretty patchwork hot pad featuring the Clementine line of fabrics in the Anna Griffin shop. You can make this project with fat quarters or scraps, and it makes a great housewarming gift!

Head over to Sewing Mama RaeAnna for the tutorial!

Mosaic Tiles Messenger Bag Tutorial with Katy of The Littlest Thistle

Hi, I’m Katy from The Littlest Thistle, and I’m really happy to be here today with another Mosaic Tiles block project from Lindsay’s new book, Modern Bee.

I know how hard Lindsay worked to make her book dream become a reality, and I’m delighted that it came together in such a lovely book. For my stop, well, I’m a bag lady at heart, so I’m afraid my project was only ever going to find its way into a bag somehow!  I love how this Mosaic Tiles block isn’t a traditional symmetric block, making it a perfect project to put on a bag for a nice, modern young lady.  It finishes up at 12″ x 12″ x 3″, with an adjustable strap and a simple button closure.

 

To make this bag, you will need:

  • Scraps for coloured squares in the block
  • 1 yd main outer fabric
  • 1 yd lining fabric
  • 1 1/2 yds 35″ wide OR 2 1/2 yds 22″ wide fusible woven interfacing, such as Vilene G700 or Pellon SF-101 Shapeflex
  • 1 1/2 yds thick fusible fleece, such as Vilene H640 or Pellon TP971F Fusible Thermolam
  • 1 large button
  • 1 1 1/2″ strap slider + 2 1 1/2″ rectangular rings to match
  • 1 14″ zip  (please note that mine was longer and had to be cut down)

From this, you will need to cut:

From scraps:
  • 9 x 2 1/2″ squares
From main outer fabric:
  • 2 x 2″ WOF strips, subcut one to get 1 x 1 1/2″ x 11″ strip for side of flap
  • 1 x 1 1/2″ x 11″ strip for side of flap
  • 1 x 1 1/2″ x 13″ strip for bottom of flap
  • 1 x 4 1/2″ x 13″ piece for top of flap
  • 1 x 13″ x 16″ for flap lining – O1
  • 1 x 13″ x 13″ for back – O2
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – O3
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – O4
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – O5
  • 1 x 6″ x WOF for strap – O6
  • 2 x 3″ x 6″ for strap ends – O7
From lining fabric:
  • 3 x 13″ x 13″ for back/front/back of front pocket – L1
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – L2
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – L3
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – L4
  • 1 x 7″ x 13″ for lining patch pocket – L5
From fusible woven interfacing:
  • 2 x 13″ x 16″ for flap – W1
  • 2 x 13″ x 13″ for back/back of front pocket – W2
  • 1 x 10 3/4″ x 13″ for bottom of front zip pocket – W3
  • 1 x 3″ x 13″ for top of front zip pocket – W4
  • 3 x 4″ x 13″ for base and sides – W5
  • 1 x 6″ x WOF for strap – W6
  • 2 x 3″ x 6″ for strap ends – W7
From fusible fleece:
  • 1 x 12″ x 15″ for flap – F1
  • 2 x 12″ x 12″ for back/back of front pocket – F2
  • 1 x 9 3/4″ x 12″ for bottom of front zip pocket – F3
  • 1 x 2″ x 12″ for top of front zip pocket – F4
  • 3 x 3″ x 12″ for base and sides – F5

 

Preparing the pieces:

Fuse the fusible woven interfacing onto the back of the fabric pieces according to the manufacturer’s instructions:

  • 1 x W1 -> O1
  • 1 x W2 -> O2
  • 1 x W2 -> 1 x L1
  • W3 -> O3
  • W4 -> O4
  • 3 x W5 -> 3 x O5
  • W6 -> O6
  • 2 x W7 -> 2 x O7
Centre the following on the back of each fabric/woven interfacing piece, leaving a 1/2″ seam allowance all the way round, then fuse according to the manufacturer’s instructions:
  • 1 x F2 -> O2
  • 1 x F2 -> L1
  • F3 -> O3
  • F4 -> O4
  • 3 x F5 -> 3 x O5

Making the bag:

Please note that there is a 1/2″ seam allowance (SA) unless otherwise stated.  Remember to back stitch at either end!

1. Using the 2″ strips of the outer fabric, and the 2 1/2″ squares, assemble the block as per the instructions in the book with a 1/4″ SA:

2. Add the two 1 1/2″ x 11″ strips to either side of the block, then the 1 1/2″ x 13″ strip at the bottom, and the 4 1/2″ x 13″ piece at the top all using a 1/4″ SA.  Press your seams really well, then fuse the remaining W1 piece to the back, followed by the F1 piece.

3. Take your zip and work out where the tape meets the side of piece O3.  Make a small mark, then make a few stitches at that point to keep the tape together when assembling the pocket – make sure the zipper is on the correct side of the stitches!

 

4. Turn your zip face down on top of piece O3, making sure the teeth are 1/2″ from the edge of the fabric, then tack in place close to the edge of the tape:

5. Place lining piece L2 face down on top of piece O3, right sides together (RST) sandwiching the zip in between, and stitch in place:

6. Flip both pieces of fabric away from the zip, so that they are wrong sides together (WST) and top stitch along the edge of the fabric near the zip teeth.

7. Take the zip, and place face down on top of piece O4,  making sure the teeth are 1/2″ from the edge of the fabric, then tack in place close to the edge of the tape:

Zip facing down
Zip facing up

8.  Place lining piece L3 face down on top of piece O4, RST, sandwiching the zip in between, and stitch in place:

9. Flip both pieces of fabric away from the zip, so that they are WST and top stitch along the edge of the fabric near the zip teeth.

10. Place pocket on top of piece L1 which has had the fusible interfacing/fleece applied so that the lining pieces are RST, then tack all the way round about 1/4″ from the edge. Trim any excess zipper tape at this point.

11. Take one piece O5, and placing it so that the short edges are top and bottom, draw a line 1/2″ up from the bottom right hand corner between the fusible fleece and the edge:

12. Place marked piece O5 RST on top of the front pocket piece at the right hand side and sew from the very top down to the marked line and stop there.

13. Repeat with piece O2 and another piece O5, marked in the same way as in step 11.  Note that it will also be on the right hand side.

14. Place the pieces from steps 12 and 13 and place them RST.  Mark the bottom right hand corners of pieces O2 and the outer pockets as per step 11, and stitch together at both sides down to the marked line.  You should now have a tube shaped piece.

15. Take the remaining piece O5 and make a mark 1/2″ in from each side at each corner:

 

16. Taking the remaining piece O5, place RST with the pocket side of the tube, matching the long edges.  Note that you will need to pin the sides out of the way.  Going only between the corner marks, stitch together.

17. Work your way round, doing one short side next, then the back, then the remaining short side, ensuring that you only sew between the marks each time.

18. Trim the excess fabric away from each side at each bottom corner:

 

Note that I approach the corner at a shallow angle, to ensure no overlap when the bag is right sides out

19. Turn the bag right sides out:

20. Take one piece O7 and fold in half, matching short edges, and press.  Then fold the short edges into the centre and press.  Repeat with the remaining piece O7.

21. Stitch all the way around each piece 1/8″ from the edge, starting at one short edge, then coming down the open edge before going across the bottom and up the folded edge.

22. Fold piece O6 as per step 20, except matching the long edges together.  Fold each end in by 1/2″ and press.

23. Stitch all the way around as per step 21.

22. Draw a line 1/2″ in from the top stitching at one end of the strap, then join the opposite corners with diagonal lines.  Loop that end of the strap over the cross bar of the slider by 1 1/2″ so that the marked lines are facing upwards.  Following the top stitching already there, stitch round he rectangle twice, using the drawn line as the 4th side, then sew up one diagonal line, across the top and down the other diagonal, and repeat:

23. Take one piece O7 and thread through one rectangle ring, matching short edges.  Centre on the side of the bag, and stitch in place 1/4″ from the edge, going back and forth along the line 3 or 4 times for security.

24. Repeat with remaining piece O7 and rectangular ring, then set bag aside.

25. Place the block flap piece RST with piece O1 and all the way around, leaving the top edge  completely open.  Trim the corners as per step 18, then turn right side out:

26. Press and top stitch round the 3 stitched sides 1/8″ from the edge, then tack the top edge closed 1/4″ from the edge

27.  Make a mark in the centre of the flap 3/4″ from the bottom

28.  Using the buttonhole stitch on your machine, make a buttonhole big enough for your chosen button

29. Place the flap RST with the back of the bag, matching raw edges and tack in place 1/4″ from the edge.

 

30. Take piece L5 and fold in half RST, matching short edges, and sew all round open edges, leaving a 2″ gap for turning.  Trim the corners as per step 18 and turn through the gap.  Push out the corners and press.

31.  Place pocket on top of one piece L1, centred and 4″ down from the top, with the folded edge uppermost, then top stitch along the sides and bottom of the pocket 1/8″ from the edge.

32.  Assemble the bag lining in the same was as the outer from steps 11 to 18, making sure that on one long side of the base you leave a gap 7″ long for turning.

33.  Place the outer bag inside the lining bag and pin in place carefully all the way round, making sure the edges match.

34. Stitch all the way round, then turn the bag through the opening in the base of the lining.  Press in place, then top stitch 1/8″ from the edge all the way round the top of the bag:

35. Thread the strap through one rectangle ring, back through the slider, and finally through the remaining ring with a 1 1/2″ foldover.  Stitch in place as per step 22.

36. Ladder stitch or slip stitch the opening in the lining closed.

37. Sew your button onto the front of the front pocket of the bag, then stand back and admire your bag:

 

 

Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along This post is part of the Mosaic Tiles Quilt Along, which you can read about here! You can enter your project any time between now and February 14, 2014 for a chance to win some great prizes. We hope you’ll join us in this beginner-friendly and stress-free quilt along.

Ruffle-Edge Baby Blanket Tutorial + Giveaway!

Hello, Craft Buds! Lindsay here, and I’m guest posting today on the Shannon Fabrics blog with a tutorial for this super-snuggly baby blanket!

Have you ever sewn with Cuddle Fabrics? Shannon’s Cuddle collection is the softest, silkiest fabric ever… similar to a minky fabric you’d find at many fabrics stores. I’ve really enjoyed sewing with them, and the timing couldn’t be more perfect. My husband and I are expecting our first baby this January!

We won’t know for a couple weeks if it’s a boy or a girl. But, I was dying to cut into this chevron print Cuddle fabric in baby pink. So, I just went for it, and opted for a neutral white on the other side! The ruffle binding is a navy blue jersey I had left over from a dress. So I went with a little blue and a little pink. I really love the color combo!

Want to make your own cute ruffle-edge baby blanket? You’ll need 3 yards of Cuddle fabric (1-1/2 yards each for the front and back), plus some jersey fabric for the ruffle. The finished blanket is 45″ x 45″, and I’m sharing the tutorial over on the Shannon Fabrics blog.

Get the Ruffle-Edge Baby Blanket Tutorial

Giveaway!

Shannon Fabrics is giving you the chance to win 3 yards of Cuddle fabric of your choice, which is enough to make your very own Cuddle blanket! To enter to win, just fill out the Rafflecopter form below. Entries open to U.S. Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Something New Sampler Quilt Along

something new sampler header

Looking for your next project?

Resolved to learn some new sewing skills this year?

Want to win some great prizes?

Then join in the blog hop for The Something New Sampler! Each week, one or two bloggers will present a block tutorial with an uncommonly used technique. There will be a total of 9 blocks presented. And, just to mix it up, we’re going with a funky modern block size: 7″ x 14″! We’ll have plenty of suggestions on how to use this block shape along the way. There’s no need for our modern blocks to always be square :)

Here’s our schedule:

Jan 14th
Amy @ thecutelifesmiles.blogspot.com | Bargello piecing

Jan 21st
Heidi @ buttonsandbutterflies.com | folding
Chelsea @ pinsandbobbins.blogspot.co.uk | a scraptastic technique

Jan 28th
Lindsay @ lindsaysews.com | reverse applique

Feb 4th
M-R @ quiltmatters.blogspot.com | trapunto
Heidi @ fabricmutt.blogspot.com | cathedral windows

Feb 11th
Alyssa @ pileofabric.com | pinless curves
Becky @ myfabricobsession.blogspot.com | machine applique

And stop by the cute life on Fridays for tips and tutorials on how to set these rectangular blocks! Posts will be up on the following dates: Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1, Feb 8, Feb 15

Be sure to join the flickr group to keep up with the hop, the chatter, and some inspirational photos.

Prizes!

At the end, link up a blog post or flickr photo with anything you’ve done from the sampler series, even if it’s just one block! There are two categories for prizes:

1) Finished projects: Winners will be chosen by popular vote. “Finished” includes an entirely completed smaller project, like a pillow, table runner, mini quilt, etc. Pieced quilt tops also count as “finished”, even if not quilted.

2) Participation prizes: Winners will be chosen by a random number generator. Link up any progress you’ve made!

Prizes for the Something New Sampler

 

Fort Worth Fabric Studio is an online fabric shop with yardage and some fantastic custom bundles you won’t find anywhere else! One of these bundles the Lagoon bundle – is a prize, and it is centered around Michael Miller’s Lagoon line, with 18 fat quarters. You can also sign up for their newsletter to be eligible for a monthly prize. In addition to the bundle, they are also offering a $25 gift certificate.

Cotton Blossom Farm stocks great designer fabrics with plenty of modern options. One great feature of this website is the ability to search through fabrics based on categories such as color – it’s just like shopping in a brick and mortar shop! You have the chance to win a set of ten 1/2 yards (of your choosing!) of Simply Color from them.

Fat Quarter Shop is another online shop that sells yardage and precuts of some of the most popular fabrics. They offer next day shipping and have an incredibly large selection! Fat Quarter Shop also has a great selection of other items, such as books, magazines, and kits. They have generously donated a jelly roll of Paris Flea Market and an Amy Butler pattern for prizes.

Sew Me a Song is an Etsy shop that stocks Japanese and contemporary fabrics. Becca puts together some fabulous bundles of texty prints, polka dots, and – of course! – lots of Melody Miller prints. Don’t miss the great collection of Type by Julia Rothman. She has created two custom bundles especially for our sampler event, one with six texty fat quarters and one with eight japanese prints.

e-Reader Sleeves: iPad or Kindle Cover Pattern

Zippered e-Reader Sleeve Tutorial
Looking for an e-reader sleeve to protect your iPad, Kindle, tablet or other device? This easy zippered iPad sleeve is lined and quilted to keep your device protected and dust-free! The e-reader cover can be made with our easy and free sewing pattern, which will teach you how to install a simple zipper in a fully-lined pouch. It also works great as a simple, lined pouch for your journal, pen or crafting supplies. The device cover makes a great gift, too!

Materials
– 2 fat quarters (18”x22”) of cotton quilting fabric
– Quilt batting scraps (4 pieces slightly larger than outer fabric)
– 11″ or longer zipper (1.5″ longer than the widest measurement of your device)
– Sewing machine with zipper foot

Finished Size
10.5″ long x 8.25″ wide

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted.

Cutting:

iPad Size Sleeve:
From outer fabric and lining fabric, cut (2) rectangles 9.25″ x 11.5″ and (2) zipper tabs tabs 1.5” x 3”. From batting, cut (4) pieces slightly larger than outer fabric.

Any Size e-Reader Sleeve:
Measure your device and add 2″ to height and width. For instance, since the iPad is 7.25″ x 9.5″ (and just 1/2″ thick), I added 2″ to the length and width, which is what I used for my pattern pieces.

Quilting the Panels


Stack outer fabric on quilt batting. Quilt as desired. I chose a wavy lines design.


Adhere the lining pieces against your other batting scraps, and quilt as desired. I used a can of spray baste adhesive and two free-motion quilting designs: one stipple and one square quilting shapes. Trim the excess batting off the outer fabric and lining pieces.

Prepping the Zipper


Fold zipper tabs in half widthwise, to make a square shape.


On the right side of zipper, position fold of one zipper tab so it just overlaps metal end of zipper. Center and pin in place. Using zipper foot, stitch zipper tabs in place with horizontal line along folded edge, about 1/8” from fold. Avoid metal parts as you sew.


Position other folded zipper tab so fold just overlaps edge of zipper pull. Again, center and pin in place. Test zipper to make sure tabs do not interfere with zipping. This is what your zipper tabs will look like.

Note: If using a zipper longer than 10″, pin zipper tabs so entire length from end of one tab to end of the other tab is as wide or wider than you pouch front. Then use scissors or pliers to trim off excess from zipper end.

Attach Zipper to Panels


Center zipper edge along the pouch front, so right sides of pouch and zipper are facing. Pin edge of zipper to raw edge of top flap. With zipper on top, stitch 1/4” from pinned edge.


Place the other outside panel in front of you, and align the zipper against the long raw edge, and pin. The right sides of the fabric should be facing. Stitch zipper edge to the panel.

how to sew an E-reader sleeve
This is what you should see after stitching the zipper to both outer panels.


Lay the pouch wrong side up. Pin the right side of one lining panel to the exposed zipper edge. Stitch 1/4” from pinned edges to attach the lining panel.


This is what you’ll see when you open up the first panel.


Place the raw edge of the second lining panel against the raw edge of the zipper, so that both linings face each other. Pin in place and stitch 1/4″ from the edge.


This is what the lining of your zipper pouch will look like, opened up.


If you’d like, you can top stitch very close to the zipper, to sew the lining and pouch front together. This will help the zipper from sticking due to bunched up fabric.


Leave zipper unzipped, and pin together right sides of pouch body. Pin together right sides of lining pieces.


Stitch 1/4” around perimeter of both body and lining, leaving 4” open at bottom of lining for turning.


Turn pouch inside out, and push lining into bag.

sew an iPad sleeve or cover

Press clutch and hand-stitch lining closed. Enjoy your new quilted iPad case, Kindle cover or e-Reader sleeve!

E-Reader Sleeves

If you make this free e-reader sleeve sewing pattern, we’d love to see it in the Craft Buds Flickr group! If you are looking for a beginner’s version of this project, try the Easy Lined Zipper Pouch.

Easy Lined Zipper Pouch

how to sew an easy, lined zipper pouch

Have no fear of the zipper! This lined zipper pouch tutorial will show you just how easy it is to create a zip-bag to store your goodies. When you don’t need to carry everything with you, replace your purse with a simple zipper clutch and store your keys, cards and cash! When you are done, you can use this same method to create a zipper pouch in various sizes based on your needs.

Materials
– 2 fat quarters (18”x22”) of cotton quilting fabric
– 9″ zipper
– Sewing machine with zipper foot
– Optional: medium-weight fusible interfacing

Want to print these instructions for later? Download the FREE 10-page PDF pattern with color photos here!

Finished Size
9-1/2″ long x 6-1/2″ tall

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted.

Cutting:

From outer fabric, cut (2) rectangles 10″ x 7″  and (2) zipper tabs tabs 1-1/2” x 3”.

From lining fabric, cut (2) rectangles 10″ x 7″.

Assembly:

Fold zipper tabs in half widthwise, to make a square shape. On the right side of zipper, position fold of one zipper tab so it just overlaps metal end of zipper. Center and pin in place.

Position other folded zipper tab so fold just overlaps edge of zipper pull. Again, center and pin in place.  Note: Turn the sewing machine slowly with your hand when sewing close to metal parts, so as not to break a needle.

Using zipper foot, stitch zipper tabs in place with horizontal line along folded edge, about 1/8” from fold. Avoid metal parts as you sew. Test zipper to make sure tabs do not interfere with zipping.

sewing zipper tabs

Your zipper should look like this with both of the tabs attached.

Center zipper edge to pouch front, so right sides of pouch and zipper are facing. Pin edge of zipper to raw edge of top flap.

With zipper on top, stitch 1/4” from pinned edge.

Stack clutch back on clutch front, right sides facing, and pin raw edge of clutch back to free edge of zipper and repeat stitching.

This is what your pouch front should look like, when opened.

Now, it’s time to attach the lining!

Lay out the zipper pouch with the fabric wrong side up. (In the picture above, one outer fabric panel is folded back.) With wrong side of lining facing up, pin right side of lining to exposed zipper edge, as pictured.

When you fold back the lining, this is what you should see: the right side of the lining fabric. Stitch 1/4” from pinned edge to attach the first lining panel.

Now, repeat this process to attach the second lining panel on the exposed zipper edge. Pin the lining right side down against the raw edge of the zipper, and then stitch 1/4″ from edge.

This is what the lining panels will look like when they are sewn. You should see the back of the zipper and the right sides of both lining panels.

Leave zipper unzipped, and pin together right sides of clutch body, making sure to align top strips. Pin together right sides of lining pieces.

Stitch 1/4” around perimeter of both body and lining, leaving 4” open at bottom of lining for turning.

Through the opening you left earlier, carefully turn the bag inside out. Push lining inside of the bag and smooth out the corners. Press pouch and hand-stitch the lining closed.

How to sew a simple zip bag

Enjoy your new lined zipper pouch! Wasn’t that easy? If you make this pattern, we’d love to see it in the Craft Buds Flickr group!

How to sew a zipper bag

Once you are comfortable with this simple zippered pouch, try out the quilted version: e-Reader Sleeves: iPad or Kindle Cover Pattern.

Download the FREE printable PDF pattern with color photos here!

Whirligig Quilt Block Tutorial

This tutorial will show you how to make a 12.5″ square whirligig block, alternating colorful scraps of fabric with your background or focus fabric. This is the perfect size for many quilting bees – I hope you find it helpful!

4x5 Bee (4th Qtr) for Elizabeth

To begin, make a template from cardboard (like a cereal or pasta box). Cut a cardboard rectangle that is 2.5″ x 3.25″.

With the rectangle positioned longways, mark 1.25″ from the top left and 1.25″ from the bottom right. Cut a straight line connecting these dots. In other words, you will slice the rectangle on a slight diagonal right through the center of the longer edges.

You now have a cardboard template that is 2.5″ (left side) x 1.25″ (skinny top) x 2.5″ (diagonal right edge) x 1.75″ (wide bottom). Discard the half of the template; you will only need one side.

From your white background fabric, cut 18 rectangles that are 2.5″ x 3.25″ (your original rectangle size). Now use your cardboard template to slice your rectangles on the same diagonal as your template, creating 36 individual pieces. Set aside.

Next, sort your scraps and locate 9 different fabrics. Each fabric scrap should be large enough to cut 4 pieces directly from the cardboard template. Cut and arrange your whirligig “wings” so that like fabrics are grouped together.

Pair each white background piece with a colored piece, right sides facing. You’ll be stitching pieces together along the diagonal.

Here’s another view showing how the white and colored fabrics should go together. As you can see, I let the top corner of the white piece stick out a bit (about 1/16″ to 1/8″), just as I let the bottom corner of the bottom piece poke out. This will actually help your blocks to be even when you stitch them together.

Use a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. This is just a hair smaller than a true 1/4″. You’ll probably want to chain-piece these fabrics to save time and thread. (See below.) Back-stitch at the beginning and end of each piece. After chain-stitching the blocks, snip the connecting threads to separate.

With the back of each block facing you, use the back of your fingernail to press each seam open. The other option is to push your seam over to the patterned side; however, I find that pressing seams open makes the patchwork look more exact. Arrange your blocks as shown.

To join these blocks, stitch the two left blocks together, then the two right blocks, using your scant 1/4″ seam allowance. Chain stitch as before, and snip the threads, to save a few steps.

Again, press the seams open, then join the left and right sides with your scant seam allowance. Make sure the center seam from each side matches up in your whirligig block.

Carefully trim edges even. You should barely need to trim off anything, but trim up to 1/8″ if anything is hanging over. This will help make your final block easier to stitch. Repeat this process for your other 8 whirligigs, being sure to trim as needed.

To join your whirligig blocks together, change your seam allowance to a true 1/4″. (I slid my needle just one place to the left.) If you forget this step, your block will be closer to 13″ square when finished.

Arrange your 9 whirligigs so you have a good balance of colors, then pin together and stitch the first two blocks from each row. Join the third block to each row, making sure each point matches up with the seam from the next block. Press the seams open, and trim each row up to 1/8″ to even up the long edges.

To join your rows, match up seams, pinning together at each intersection. Stitch slowly, slightly pulling the fabric as needed when you approach an intersection. No matter how carefully you measure, you’ll need to push and pull fabric slightly to match seams perfectly.

Using these recommended seam allowances, you should now be able to trim the block to an even 12.5″ square.  I made these blocks in assorted colors for a quilt bee on Flickr, based on this fun variation by Jessica. This is a great block to make in a variety of colors and patterns for your quilting bee.

If you make any blocks using this tutorial, feel free to send us a link, or share it in the Craft Buds Flickr pool.

 

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Felt Flower Gift Card Holder

Felt Flower Gift Card Sleeve

It’s hard to beat the practicality of giving a gift card. But you don’t have to wrap them in generic envelopes from the store. Dress up plain gift cards with these quick and easy felt flower gift card holders!

You’ll need:

  • Felt scraps (various colors)
  • Die cutter (I used the Accuquilt GO! Baby and Rose of Sharon die) -or- printed shapes and scissors
  • Sewing machine or needle and thread
  • Pinking Shears
  • Glue gun and buttons (optional)

Felt Flowers

Die-cut flower shapes from scrap felt in various colors. Pair large blooms with smaller blooms, centers and leaves and set aside. If you are not using a die cutter, you can print off shapes from the Internet, trace around cookie cutters, or use this method to cut flower petals from felt without a template.

Use pinking shears to cut a rectangle of felt approximately 8″ x 3″. (Photo shows felt folded in half.)

Gift card sleeve tutorial

Unfold felt and center flower across the top half of felt rectangle. Stitch in place just through the center, catching all layers of flower. I stitched a preset star shape using my sewing machine, but you could also hand sew. Stitch on leaves to embellish.

Stitch felt flower and leaves

Fold gift card sleeve in half, leaving the back of sleeve about 1/4″ longer than the front. Align pinked edges and stitch 1/4″ from right edge, top to bottom. Repeat on left edge.

Stitch around gift card sleeve

Trim thread tails. Hot-glue a button to the flower center (covering stitches) if desired.

Felt gift card holder

Fill and place gift card envelopes on the tree or inside stockings. Use as package embellishments or just tuck them inside holiday cards for a fun surprise.

Felt flower gift card sleeves

Stitch up a bunch in different colors to use for holidays, birthdays, showers, teacher gifts, thank you gifts and more!

Felt flower gift card holders

If you use this or any of our tutorials, we’d love to see your projects. Leave us a comment or add a photo of your photo to the Craft Buds Flickr pool.
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